Assessing Lung Cancer Incidence Disparities Between Puerto Ricans and Other Racial/Ethnic Groups in the United States, 1992–2010

William A. Calo, Erick Suárez, Marievelisse Soto-Salgado, Rafael A. Quintana, Ana P. Ortiz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study compared the incidence of lung cancer among Puerto Ricans (PRs) with that of Whites, Blacks, and Hispanics in the United States. We computed age-standardized rates of lung cancer during 1992–2010 and percentages of change over time. Standardized rate ratios (SRR) were estimated to assess racial/ethnic and gender differences. All men groups showed a significant decline in lung cancer over time but PRs observed the smallest change (−1.2 %). For both men and women, PRs had lower incidence rates compared to other racial/ethnic groups (SRR < 1; P < 0.05). Among all groups, men reported higher incidence rates than women but PRs showed the largest gender disparity (SRR = 2.29). This study showed that although PRs exhibited lower incidence rates of lung cancer, this subgroup of Hispanics faced an important burden of lung cancer, principally because PR men had the smallest decline over time and the largest gender difference among all groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)971-975
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 30 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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