Assessing the consequences of climate change for food security: A view from the intergovernmental panel on climate change

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Considerable progress in understanding how global climate change is likely to affect agricultural production and forest resources has been made in recent years. In the recent Third Assessment Report (TAR) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) Working Group (WG) II (IPCC, 2001), agriculture was combined in a chapter with other, less managed terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in order to assess its response to climate change. This was intended to facilitate comparison of the impacts of climate change on basic biological and ecological processes across ecosystems (including agroecosystems and forest ecosystems) in a consistent manner. However, agroecosystems are fundamentally different from less managed ecosystems such as wetlands, tundra, and savannas: they produce economically valuable goods and services within a system of clear and enforceable property rights. Such greatly complicates understanding of their response to climate change because of intense human intervention into climate-ecosystem interactions and because responses of these ecosystems to climate change can have direct and immediate economic impacts. Hence, I focus on agriculture in this chapter.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationClimate Change and Global Food Security
PublisherCRC Press
Pages269-292
Number of pages24
ISBN (Electronic)9781420028614
ISBN (Print)9780824725365
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Fingerprint

Food Supply
Climate Change
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
food security
Climate change
Ecosystem
climate change
Ecosystems
ecosystem
agricultural ecosystem
ecosystems
agriculture
Agriculture
agroecosystems
property rights
forest resource
tundra
terrestrial ecosystem
economic impact
agricultural production

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

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Assessing the consequences of climate change for food security : A view from the intergovernmental panel on climate change. / Easterling, William.

Climate Change and Global Food Security. CRC Press, 2005. p. 269-292.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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