Assessment of an integrated weed management system in no-till soybean and corn

Elina M. Snyder, William S. Curran, Heather D. Karsten, Glenna M. Malcolm, Sjoerd W. Duiker, Jeffrey A. Hyde

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate weed control, crop yields, potential soil loss, and net returns to management of an integrated weed management system in no-till corn and soybean compared to an herbicide-based strategy. The integrated weed management system reduced herbicide inputs by delayed cover crop termination, herbicide banding, and high-residue cultivation (reduced herbicide [RH]), while the other system used continuous no-tillage and herbicides to control weeds (standard herbicide [SH]). Research was conducted within the Penn State Sustainable Dairy Cropping Systems Experiment, where corn and soybean are each planted once in a 6-yr crop rotation. In this 3-yr study, weed density and biomass were often greater under RH management, but weed biomass never exceeded 19 g m-2 in corn and 21 g m-2 in soybean. Corn yield and population did not differ in any year, and net returns to management were33.65 ha-1 higher in RH corn due to lower herbicide costs and slightly, though not significantly, higher yields. Soybean yield was lower in RH compared to SH in 2 of 3 yr, and was correlated with soybean population and cover crop residue. Net financial returns were43.69 ha-1 higher in SH soybean compared to RH. Predicted soil loss never exceeded T (maximum allowable soil loss) for any treatment and slope combination, though soil loss was 100% greater on a 10% slope under RH management (vs. SH) due to cultivation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)712-726
Number of pages15
JournalWeed Science
Volume64
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science

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