Assimilation of all-sky infrared radiances from Himawari-8 and impacts of moisture and hydrometer initialization on convection-permitting tropical cyclone prediction

Masashi Minamide, Fuqing Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study explores the impacts of assimilating all-sky infrared satellite radiances from Himawari-8, a newgeneration geostationary satellite that shares similar remote sensing technology with the U.S. geostationary satellite GOES-16, for convection-permitting initialization and prediction of tropical cyclones with an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF). This case studies the rapid intensification stages of Supertyphoon Soudelor (2015), one of the most intense tropical cyclones ever observed by Himawari-8. It is found that hourly cycling assimilation of the infrared radiance improves not only the estimate of the initial intensity, but also the spatial distribution of essential convective activity associated with the incipient tropical cyclone vortex. Deterministic convection-permitting forecasts initialized from the EnKF analyses are capable of simulating the early development of Soudelor, which demonstrates encouraging prospects for future improvement in tropical cyclone prediction through assimilating all-sky radiances from geostationary satellites such as Himawari-8 and GOES-16.Aseries of forecast sensitivity experiments are designed to systematically explore the impacts of moisture updates in the data assimilation cycles on the development and prediction of Soudelor. It is found that the assimilation of the brightness temperatures contributes not only to better constraining moist convection within the inner-core region, but also to developing a more resilient initial vortex, both of which are necessary to properly capture the rapid intensification process of tropical cyclones.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3241-3258
Number of pages18
JournalMonthly Weather Review
Volume146
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Atmospheric Science

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