Association Between Self-Reported Dental Hygiene Practices and Dental Procedure-Related Recurrent Angioedema Attacks in HAE Subjects: A Multicenter Survey

Umesh Singh, William R. Lumry, Paula Busse, H. James Wedner, Aleena Banerji, Timothy J. Craig, H. Henry Li, Raffi Tachdjian, Joshua S. Jacobs, Marc A. Riedl, Mark Davis-Lorton, Sandra C. Christiansen, Bruce L. Zuraw, Jonathan A. Bernstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Hereditary angioedema (HAE) symptoms may be triggered by dental procedures, thereby complicating dental care in individuals affected by the condition. Objective: This study investigated the self-perceived dental care needs, perceived susceptibility to acute angioedema (AE) attacks after dental procedures, and dental care behavior of patients with HAE. Methods: A self-administered semistructured web-based questionnaire was distributed to 250 adult patients with HAE (type 1 or 2; 88% type 1) and 256 matched non-HAE controls. Data were analyzed using stratified χ2 tests, logistic regression, and classification trees. Results: A total of 46.4% of HAE versus 55.5% of control patients had dental visits within 6 months (P =.04). Dental insurance was a barrier to seeking routine dental visits among both groups. However, significantly fewer patients with HAE had routine dental visits within 6 months despite having dental insurance compared with control patients (48% vs 60%, P =.01). Within the HAE group, a significantly greater number of patients with dental visits at intervals greater than 6 months had a history of recurrent postprocedural AE attacks (odds ratio [OR]: 3.9 [1.7, 8.8], P =.0005) and used antibacterial toothpaste more frequently than those without recurrent AE attacks (OR: 4.7 [1.5, 15.4], P =.005). Conclusions: These data support the hypothesis that patients with HAE who are predisposed to having AE episodes in response to medical or physical trauma visit the dentist less and engage in specific oral hygiene practices more frequently than matched control patients and patients with HAE who reported that they were less likely to swell after a dental procedure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3162-3169.e5
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice
Volume8
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Association Between Self-Reported Dental Hygiene Practices and Dental Procedure-Related Recurrent Angioedema Attacks in HAE Subjects: A Multicenter Survey'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this