Association between the inception of a SAFE KIDS Coalition and changes in pediatric unintentional injury rates

Robert Tamburro, R. I. Shorr, A. J. Bush, S. B. Kritchevsky, G. L. Stidham, S. A. Helms

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the relationship between the implementation of a SAFE KIDS Coalition and pediatric unintentional injury rates. Setting: Shelby County, Tennessee. Design: Retrospective observational analysis. Patients: County residents nine years of age or younger presenting to the children's medical center, its emergency department, or its outpatient clinics from 1990-97. Intervention: Implementation of a SAFE KIDS Coalition. Main outcome measures: Rates of unintentional injuries targeted by the SAFE KIDS Coalition that resulted in hospitalization or in death. Rates of motor vehicle occupant injuries that resulted in hospitalization or in death. Rates of non-targeted unintentional injuries, namely injuries secondary to animals and by exposure to toxic plants. Rates of severe injuries (defined as those targeted injuries that required hospitalization or resulted in death), and specifically, severe motor vehicle occupant injuries were compared before and after the inception of the coalition using Poisson regression analysis. Results: The relative risk of targeted severe injury rates decreased after implementation of the coalition even after controlling for changes in hospital admission rates. Specifically, severe motor vehicle occupant injury rates decreased 30% (relative risk 0.70; 95% confidence interval 0.54 to 0.89) after initiation of the coalition. Conclusions: The implementation of a SAFE KIDS Coalition was associated with a decrease in severe targeted injuries, most notably, severe motor vehicle occupant injuries. Although causality cannot be determined, these data suggest that the presence of a coalition may be associated with decreased severe unintentional injury rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)242-245
Number of pages4
JournalInjury Prevention
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2002

Fingerprint

Pediatrics
Wounds and Injuries
Motor Vehicles
Hospitalization
Toxic Plants
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Causality
Hospital Emergency Service
Regression Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Confidence Intervals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Tamburro, R., Shorr, R. I., Bush, A. J., Kritchevsky, S. B., Stidham, G. L., & Helms, S. A. (2002). Association between the inception of a SAFE KIDS Coalition and changes in pediatric unintentional injury rates. Injury Prevention, 8(3), 242-245. https://doi.org/10.1136/ip.8.3.242
Tamburro, Robert ; Shorr, R. I. ; Bush, A. J. ; Kritchevsky, S. B. ; Stidham, G. L. ; Helms, S. A. / Association between the inception of a SAFE KIDS Coalition and changes in pediatric unintentional injury rates. In: Injury Prevention. 2002 ; Vol. 8, No. 3. pp. 242-245.
@article{832ace7d16a14ed4875f7c6389a07967,
title = "Association between the inception of a SAFE KIDS Coalition and changes in pediatric unintentional injury rates",
abstract = "Objective: To assess the relationship between the implementation of a SAFE KIDS Coalition and pediatric unintentional injury rates. Setting: Shelby County, Tennessee. Design: Retrospective observational analysis. Patients: County residents nine years of age or younger presenting to the children's medical center, its emergency department, or its outpatient clinics from 1990-97. Intervention: Implementation of a SAFE KIDS Coalition. Main outcome measures: Rates of unintentional injuries targeted by the SAFE KIDS Coalition that resulted in hospitalization or in death. Rates of motor vehicle occupant injuries that resulted in hospitalization or in death. Rates of non-targeted unintentional injuries, namely injuries secondary to animals and by exposure to toxic plants. Rates of severe injuries (defined as those targeted injuries that required hospitalization or resulted in death), and specifically, severe motor vehicle occupant injuries were compared before and after the inception of the coalition using Poisson regression analysis. Results: The relative risk of targeted severe injury rates decreased after implementation of the coalition even after controlling for changes in hospital admission rates. Specifically, severe motor vehicle occupant injury rates decreased 30{\%} (relative risk 0.70; 95{\%} confidence interval 0.54 to 0.89) after initiation of the coalition. Conclusions: The implementation of a SAFE KIDS Coalition was associated with a decrease in severe targeted injuries, most notably, severe motor vehicle occupant injuries. Although causality cannot be determined, these data suggest that the presence of a coalition may be associated with decreased severe unintentional injury rates.",
author = "Robert Tamburro and Shorr, {R. I.} and Bush, {A. J.} and Kritchevsky, {S. B.} and Stidham, {G. L.} and Helms, {S. A.}",
year = "2002",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1136/ip.8.3.242",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
pages = "242--245",
journal = "Injury Prevention",
issn = "1353-8047",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "3",

}

Tamburro, R, Shorr, RI, Bush, AJ, Kritchevsky, SB, Stidham, GL & Helms, SA 2002, 'Association between the inception of a SAFE KIDS Coalition and changes in pediatric unintentional injury rates', Injury Prevention, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 242-245. https://doi.org/10.1136/ip.8.3.242

Association between the inception of a SAFE KIDS Coalition and changes in pediatric unintentional injury rates. / Tamburro, Robert; Shorr, R. I.; Bush, A. J.; Kritchevsky, S. B.; Stidham, G. L.; Helms, S. A.

In: Injury Prevention, Vol. 8, No. 3, 01.09.2002, p. 242-245.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association between the inception of a SAFE KIDS Coalition and changes in pediatric unintentional injury rates

AU - Tamburro, Robert

AU - Shorr, R. I.

AU - Bush, A. J.

AU - Kritchevsky, S. B.

AU - Stidham, G. L.

AU - Helms, S. A.

PY - 2002/9/1

Y1 - 2002/9/1

N2 - Objective: To assess the relationship between the implementation of a SAFE KIDS Coalition and pediatric unintentional injury rates. Setting: Shelby County, Tennessee. Design: Retrospective observational analysis. Patients: County residents nine years of age or younger presenting to the children's medical center, its emergency department, or its outpatient clinics from 1990-97. Intervention: Implementation of a SAFE KIDS Coalition. Main outcome measures: Rates of unintentional injuries targeted by the SAFE KIDS Coalition that resulted in hospitalization or in death. Rates of motor vehicle occupant injuries that resulted in hospitalization or in death. Rates of non-targeted unintentional injuries, namely injuries secondary to animals and by exposure to toxic plants. Rates of severe injuries (defined as those targeted injuries that required hospitalization or resulted in death), and specifically, severe motor vehicle occupant injuries were compared before and after the inception of the coalition using Poisson regression analysis. Results: The relative risk of targeted severe injury rates decreased after implementation of the coalition even after controlling for changes in hospital admission rates. Specifically, severe motor vehicle occupant injury rates decreased 30% (relative risk 0.70; 95% confidence interval 0.54 to 0.89) after initiation of the coalition. Conclusions: The implementation of a SAFE KIDS Coalition was associated with a decrease in severe targeted injuries, most notably, severe motor vehicle occupant injuries. Although causality cannot be determined, these data suggest that the presence of a coalition may be associated with decreased severe unintentional injury rates.

AB - Objective: To assess the relationship between the implementation of a SAFE KIDS Coalition and pediatric unintentional injury rates. Setting: Shelby County, Tennessee. Design: Retrospective observational analysis. Patients: County residents nine years of age or younger presenting to the children's medical center, its emergency department, or its outpatient clinics from 1990-97. Intervention: Implementation of a SAFE KIDS Coalition. Main outcome measures: Rates of unintentional injuries targeted by the SAFE KIDS Coalition that resulted in hospitalization or in death. Rates of motor vehicle occupant injuries that resulted in hospitalization or in death. Rates of non-targeted unintentional injuries, namely injuries secondary to animals and by exposure to toxic plants. Rates of severe injuries (defined as those targeted injuries that required hospitalization or resulted in death), and specifically, severe motor vehicle occupant injuries were compared before and after the inception of the coalition using Poisson regression analysis. Results: The relative risk of targeted severe injury rates decreased after implementation of the coalition even after controlling for changes in hospital admission rates. Specifically, severe motor vehicle occupant injury rates decreased 30% (relative risk 0.70; 95% confidence interval 0.54 to 0.89) after initiation of the coalition. Conclusions: The implementation of a SAFE KIDS Coalition was associated with a decrease in severe targeted injuries, most notably, severe motor vehicle occupant injuries. Although causality cannot be determined, these data suggest that the presence of a coalition may be associated with decreased severe unintentional injury rates.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036717824&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036717824&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/ip.8.3.242

DO - 10.1136/ip.8.3.242

M3 - Article

C2 - 12226125

AN - SCOPUS:0036717824

VL - 8

SP - 242

EP - 245

JO - Injury Prevention

JF - Injury Prevention

SN - 1353-8047

IS - 3

ER -