Associations among peer relationships, academic achievement, and persistence in college

Lisa M. Swenson Goguen, Marnie A. Hiester, Alicia H. Nordstrom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Developmental theory describes the central importance of peer relationships in the lives of young adults (e.g., Erikson, 1963). In this study we tested the importance of peer relationships to academic outcomes. First-year undergraduates completed a self-report survey to indicate the number and closeness of their friendships. We compared these variables to academic outcomes, including grade point averages (GPA) and persistence throughout the first college year. Having trust in, sharing common interests with, and the extent of conflict with a new college friend was associated with GPA and persistence to the second college year. Results are discussed in the context of assisting students in the transition into college.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-337
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory and Practice
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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academic achievement
persistence
friendship
young adult
student

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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Associations among peer relationships, academic achievement, and persistence in college. / Swenson Goguen, Lisa M.; Hiester, Marnie A.; Nordstrom, Alicia H.

In: Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory and Practice, Vol. 12, No. 3, 01.01.2010, p. 319-337.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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