Associations between air pollution and peak expiratory flow among patients with persistent asthma

Zhengmin Qian, Hung Mo Lin, Vernon Chinchilli, Erik B. Lehman, Walter F. Stewart, Nirav Shah, Yinkang Duan, Timothy Craig, William E. Wilson, Duanping Liao, Stephen C. Lazarus, Rebecca Bascom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Responses of patients with persistent asthma to ambient air pollution may be different from those of general populations. For example, asthma medications may modify the effects of ambient air pollutants on peak expiratory flow (PEF). Few studies examined the association between air pollution and PEF in patients with persistent asthma on well-defined medication regimens using asthma clinical trial data. Airway obstruction effects of ambient air pollutants, using 14,919 person-days of daily self-measured peak expiratory flow (PEF), were assessed from 154 patients with persistent asthma during the 16 wk of active treatment in the Salmeterol Off Corticosteroids Study trial. The three therapies were an inhaled corticosteroid, an inhaled long-acting β-agonist, and placebo. The participants were nonsmokers aged 12 through 63 yr, recruited from 6 university-based ambulatory care centers from February 1997 to January 1999. Air pollution data were derived from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Aerometric Information Retrieval System. An increase of 10 ppb of ambient daily mean concentrations of NO2 was associated with a decrease in PEF of 1.53 L/min (95% confidence interval [CI] -2.93 to -0.14) in models adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, asthma clinical center, season, week, daily average temperature, and daily average relative humidity. The strongest association between NO2 and PEF was observed among the patients treated with salmeterol. Negative associations were also found between PEF and SO2 and between PEF and PM10, respectively. The results show that the two medication regimens protected against the effects of PM10. However, salmeterol increased the sensitivity to NO2 and triamcinalone enhanced the sensitivity to SO2.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-46
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Toxicology and Environmental Health - Part A: Current Issues
Volume72
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

Fingerprint

Air Pollution
Air pollution
Air Pollutants
Asthma
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Information retrieval systems
Environmental Protection Agency
Atmospheric humidity
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Airway Obstruction
Ambulatory Care
Humidity
Information Systems
Salmeterol Xinafoate
Placebos
Clinical Trials
Confidence Intervals
Temperature
Therapeutics
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Toxicology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Qian, Zhengmin ; Lin, Hung Mo ; Chinchilli, Vernon ; Lehman, Erik B. ; Stewart, Walter F. ; Shah, Nirav ; Duan, Yinkang ; Craig, Timothy ; Wilson, William E. ; Liao, Duanping ; Lazarus, Stephen C. ; Bascom, Rebecca. / Associations between air pollution and peak expiratory flow among patients with persistent asthma. In: Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health - Part A: Current Issues. 2009 ; Vol. 72, No. 1. pp. 39-46.
@article{8ed655577b0e493399fe2c9890fd3a82,
title = "Associations between air pollution and peak expiratory flow among patients with persistent asthma",
abstract = "Responses of patients with persistent asthma to ambient air pollution may be different from those of general populations. For example, asthma medications may modify the effects of ambient air pollutants on peak expiratory flow (PEF). Few studies examined the association between air pollution and PEF in patients with persistent asthma on well-defined medication regimens using asthma clinical trial data. Airway obstruction effects of ambient air pollutants, using 14,919 person-days of daily self-measured peak expiratory flow (PEF), were assessed from 154 patients with persistent asthma during the 16 wk of active treatment in the Salmeterol Off Corticosteroids Study trial. The three therapies were an inhaled corticosteroid, an inhaled long-acting β-agonist, and placebo. The participants were nonsmokers aged 12 through 63 yr, recruited from 6 university-based ambulatory care centers from February 1997 to January 1999. Air pollution data were derived from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Aerometric Information Retrieval System. An increase of 10 ppb of ambient daily mean concentrations of NO2 was associated with a decrease in PEF of 1.53 L/min (95{\%} confidence interval [CI] -2.93 to -0.14) in models adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, asthma clinical center, season, week, daily average temperature, and daily average relative humidity. The strongest association between NO2 and PEF was observed among the patients treated with salmeterol. Negative associations were also found between PEF and SO2 and between PEF and PM10, respectively. The results show that the two medication regimens protected against the effects of PM10. However, salmeterol increased the sensitivity to NO2 and triamcinalone enhanced the sensitivity to SO2.",
author = "Zhengmin Qian and Lin, {Hung Mo} and Vernon Chinchilli and Lehman, {Erik B.} and Stewart, {Walter F.} and Nirav Shah and Yinkang Duan and Timothy Craig and Wilson, {William E.} and Duanping Liao and Lazarus, {Stephen C.} and Rebecca Bascom",
year = "2009",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/15287390802445517",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "72",
pages = "39--46",
journal = "Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health - Part A: Current Issues",
issn = "1528-7394",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

Associations between air pollution and peak expiratory flow among patients with persistent asthma. / Qian, Zhengmin; Lin, Hung Mo; Chinchilli, Vernon; Lehman, Erik B.; Stewart, Walter F.; Shah, Nirav; Duan, Yinkang; Craig, Timothy; Wilson, William E.; Liao, Duanping; Lazarus, Stephen C.; Bascom, Rebecca.

In: Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health - Part A: Current Issues, Vol. 72, No. 1, 01.01.2009, p. 39-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations between air pollution and peak expiratory flow among patients with persistent asthma

AU - Qian, Zhengmin

AU - Lin, Hung Mo

AU - Chinchilli, Vernon

AU - Lehman, Erik B.

AU - Stewart, Walter F.

AU - Shah, Nirav

AU - Duan, Yinkang

AU - Craig, Timothy

AU - Wilson, William E.

AU - Liao, Duanping

AU - Lazarus, Stephen C.

AU - Bascom, Rebecca

PY - 2009/1/1

Y1 - 2009/1/1

N2 - Responses of patients with persistent asthma to ambient air pollution may be different from those of general populations. For example, asthma medications may modify the effects of ambient air pollutants on peak expiratory flow (PEF). Few studies examined the association between air pollution and PEF in patients with persistent asthma on well-defined medication regimens using asthma clinical trial data. Airway obstruction effects of ambient air pollutants, using 14,919 person-days of daily self-measured peak expiratory flow (PEF), were assessed from 154 patients with persistent asthma during the 16 wk of active treatment in the Salmeterol Off Corticosteroids Study trial. The three therapies were an inhaled corticosteroid, an inhaled long-acting β-agonist, and placebo. The participants were nonsmokers aged 12 through 63 yr, recruited from 6 university-based ambulatory care centers from February 1997 to January 1999. Air pollution data were derived from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Aerometric Information Retrieval System. An increase of 10 ppb of ambient daily mean concentrations of NO2 was associated with a decrease in PEF of 1.53 L/min (95% confidence interval [CI] -2.93 to -0.14) in models adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, asthma clinical center, season, week, daily average temperature, and daily average relative humidity. The strongest association between NO2 and PEF was observed among the patients treated with salmeterol. Negative associations were also found between PEF and SO2 and between PEF and PM10, respectively. The results show that the two medication regimens protected against the effects of PM10. However, salmeterol increased the sensitivity to NO2 and triamcinalone enhanced the sensitivity to SO2.

AB - Responses of patients with persistent asthma to ambient air pollution may be different from those of general populations. For example, asthma medications may modify the effects of ambient air pollutants on peak expiratory flow (PEF). Few studies examined the association between air pollution and PEF in patients with persistent asthma on well-defined medication regimens using asthma clinical trial data. Airway obstruction effects of ambient air pollutants, using 14,919 person-days of daily self-measured peak expiratory flow (PEF), were assessed from 154 patients with persistent asthma during the 16 wk of active treatment in the Salmeterol Off Corticosteroids Study trial. The three therapies were an inhaled corticosteroid, an inhaled long-acting β-agonist, and placebo. The participants were nonsmokers aged 12 through 63 yr, recruited from 6 university-based ambulatory care centers from February 1997 to January 1999. Air pollution data were derived from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Aerometric Information Retrieval System. An increase of 10 ppb of ambient daily mean concentrations of NO2 was associated with a decrease in PEF of 1.53 L/min (95% confidence interval [CI] -2.93 to -0.14) in models adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, asthma clinical center, season, week, daily average temperature, and daily average relative humidity. The strongest association between NO2 and PEF was observed among the patients treated with salmeterol. Negative associations were also found between PEF and SO2 and between PEF and PM10, respectively. The results show that the two medication regimens protected against the effects of PM10. However, salmeterol increased the sensitivity to NO2 and triamcinalone enhanced the sensitivity to SO2.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=55449084938&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=55449084938&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/15287390802445517

DO - 10.1080/15287390802445517

M3 - Article

C2 - 18979353

AN - SCOPUS:55449084938

VL - 72

SP - 39

EP - 46

JO - Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health - Part A: Current Issues

JF - Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health - Part A: Current Issues

SN - 1528-7394

IS - 1

ER -