Associations between Child Maltreatment, Harsh Parenting, and Sleep with Adolescent Mental Health

Brian H. Calhoun, Ty A. Ridenour, Diana H Fishbein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Youth who suffer from psychiatric disorders are at high risk for negative outcomes, including aggression and substance abuse. Although many youth with psychiatric disorders have endured harsh parenting and/or child maltreatment (CM), differential associations between these experiential factors have yet to be fully explored. Sleep problems have also been implicated in psychiatric disorders and are consistently associated with CM. The overlap and unique contributions of CM and sleep problems to the mental health of youth remains unclear; longitudinal studies from late childhood into adolescence, when psychiatric illnesses frequently onset, are rare. The current longitudinal study examined associations of CM, harsh parenting, and sleep problems with symptoms of four psychiatric disorders: Conduct Disorder, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Anxiety, and Depression. Early adolescent youth with no history of substance use (N = 529) were sampled from a working class, medium-sized city in northern Kentucky, and an extensive battery of tests were administered to youth and a parent. CM was more strongly and consistently related to psychiatric disorder symptoms at baseline than was harsh parenting. Reports of harsh parenting were more strongly associated with externalizing symptoms than internalizing symptoms. Sleep problems were also positively associated with psychiatric disorder symptoms at baseline, but did not exacerbate the effects of CM or harsh parenting on symptom counts. Longitudinally, harsh parenting was more predictive of change in psychiatric symptoms two to three years later than was CM. The potential significance of childhood adversity and sleep problems for prevention of later mental health problems are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)116-130
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Child and Family Studies
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2019

Fingerprint

Child Abuse
Parenting
maltreatment
sleep
Psychiatry
Mental Health
Sleep
mental health
adolescent
maltreatment of children
longitudinal study
childhood
Longitudinal Studies
ADHD
Conduct Disorder
working class
substance abuse
aggression
adolescence
Adolescent Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

@article{ada8ddcf5a98483ea65e56d71cce1dc8,
title = "Associations between Child Maltreatment, Harsh Parenting, and Sleep with Adolescent Mental Health",
abstract = "Youth who suffer from psychiatric disorders are at high risk for negative outcomes, including aggression and substance abuse. Although many youth with psychiatric disorders have endured harsh parenting and/or child maltreatment (CM), differential associations between these experiential factors have yet to be fully explored. Sleep problems have also been implicated in psychiatric disorders and are consistently associated with CM. The overlap and unique contributions of CM and sleep problems to the mental health of youth remains unclear; longitudinal studies from late childhood into adolescence, when psychiatric illnesses frequently onset, are rare. The current longitudinal study examined associations of CM, harsh parenting, and sleep problems with symptoms of four psychiatric disorders: Conduct Disorder, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Anxiety, and Depression. Early adolescent youth with no history of substance use (N = 529) were sampled from a working class, medium-sized city in northern Kentucky, and an extensive battery of tests were administered to youth and a parent. CM was more strongly and consistently related to psychiatric disorder symptoms at baseline than was harsh parenting. Reports of harsh parenting were more strongly associated with externalizing symptoms than internalizing symptoms. Sleep problems were also positively associated with psychiatric disorder symptoms at baseline, but did not exacerbate the effects of CM or harsh parenting on symptom counts. Longitudinally, harsh parenting was more predictive of change in psychiatric symptoms two to three years later than was CM. The potential significance of childhood adversity and sleep problems for prevention of later mental health problems are discussed.",
author = "Calhoun, {Brian H.} and Ridenour, {Ty A.} and Fishbein, {Diana H}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1007/s10826-018-1261-7",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "28",
pages = "116--130",
journal = "Journal of Child and Family Studies",
issn = "1062-1024",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "1",

}

Associations between Child Maltreatment, Harsh Parenting, and Sleep with Adolescent Mental Health. / Calhoun, Brian H.; Ridenour, Ty A.; Fishbein, Diana H.

In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, Vol. 28, No. 1, 15.01.2019, p. 116-130.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations between Child Maltreatment, Harsh Parenting, and Sleep with Adolescent Mental Health

AU - Calhoun, Brian H.

AU - Ridenour, Ty A.

AU - Fishbein, Diana H

PY - 2019/1/15

Y1 - 2019/1/15

N2 - Youth who suffer from psychiatric disorders are at high risk for negative outcomes, including aggression and substance abuse. Although many youth with psychiatric disorders have endured harsh parenting and/or child maltreatment (CM), differential associations between these experiential factors have yet to be fully explored. Sleep problems have also been implicated in psychiatric disorders and are consistently associated with CM. The overlap and unique contributions of CM and sleep problems to the mental health of youth remains unclear; longitudinal studies from late childhood into adolescence, when psychiatric illnesses frequently onset, are rare. The current longitudinal study examined associations of CM, harsh parenting, and sleep problems with symptoms of four psychiatric disorders: Conduct Disorder, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Anxiety, and Depression. Early adolescent youth with no history of substance use (N = 529) were sampled from a working class, medium-sized city in northern Kentucky, and an extensive battery of tests were administered to youth and a parent. CM was more strongly and consistently related to psychiatric disorder symptoms at baseline than was harsh parenting. Reports of harsh parenting were more strongly associated with externalizing symptoms than internalizing symptoms. Sleep problems were also positively associated with psychiatric disorder symptoms at baseline, but did not exacerbate the effects of CM or harsh parenting on symptom counts. Longitudinally, harsh parenting was more predictive of change in psychiatric symptoms two to three years later than was CM. The potential significance of childhood adversity and sleep problems for prevention of later mental health problems are discussed.

AB - Youth who suffer from psychiatric disorders are at high risk for negative outcomes, including aggression and substance abuse. Although many youth with psychiatric disorders have endured harsh parenting and/or child maltreatment (CM), differential associations between these experiential factors have yet to be fully explored. Sleep problems have also been implicated in psychiatric disorders and are consistently associated with CM. The overlap and unique contributions of CM and sleep problems to the mental health of youth remains unclear; longitudinal studies from late childhood into adolescence, when psychiatric illnesses frequently onset, are rare. The current longitudinal study examined associations of CM, harsh parenting, and sleep problems with symptoms of four psychiatric disorders: Conduct Disorder, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Anxiety, and Depression. Early adolescent youth with no history of substance use (N = 529) were sampled from a working class, medium-sized city in northern Kentucky, and an extensive battery of tests were administered to youth and a parent. CM was more strongly and consistently related to psychiatric disorder symptoms at baseline than was harsh parenting. Reports of harsh parenting were more strongly associated with externalizing symptoms than internalizing symptoms. Sleep problems were also positively associated with psychiatric disorder symptoms at baseline, but did not exacerbate the effects of CM or harsh parenting on symptom counts. Longitudinally, harsh parenting was more predictive of change in psychiatric symptoms two to three years later than was CM. The potential significance of childhood adversity and sleep problems for prevention of later mental health problems are discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85054157570&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85054157570&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10826-018-1261-7

DO - 10.1007/s10826-018-1261-7

M3 - Article

C2 - 31354225

AN - SCOPUS:85054157570

VL - 28

SP - 116

EP - 130

JO - Journal of Child and Family Studies

JF - Journal of Child and Family Studies

SN - 1062-1024

IS - 1

ER -