Associations between community attachments and adolescent substance use in nationally representative samples

Laura Wray-Lake, Jennifer Maggs, Lloyd D. Johnston, Jerald G. Bachman, Patrick M. O'Malley, John E. Schulenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Social capital and social attachment theories of substance use argue that positive bonds to society and the conventional values they promote deter adolescents from substance use. Using nationally representative samples of U.S. high school seniors, we hypothesized that adolescents' community attachments, measured by social trust, social responsibility, and religiosity, would be negatively associated with lifetime and 30-day substance use. Method: We used repeated cross-sectional nationally representative high school senior data from 1976 to 2008 Monitoring the Future Study cohorts (weighted N = 64,246; 51.6% female). Participation rate ranged from 77% to 86% across years. A series of multiple linear and logistic regressions examined unique associations of adolescents' social trust, social responsibility, and religiosity with lifetime and 30-day use of cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana, hallucinogens, cocaine, amphetamines, barbiturates, tranquilizers, and narcotics. Models controlled for gender, race, college aspirations, high school grades, parents' education, and survey year. Results: Social trust, social responsibility, and religiosity showed independent negative associations with use of cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana, and six other types of drugs. After accounting for controls, community attachments related to lower lifetime and past 30-day use. Associations were consistent across measures, except social responsibility was not associated with binge drinking or lifetime illicit drugs besides marijuana. Conclusions: Study strengths included nationally representative samples, diverse substance use measures, and inclusion of controls. We extend theory by suggesting that distinct aspects of adolescents' community attachments uniquely relate to lower substance use. Results suggest potential public health benefits of integrating promotion of community attachments with substance use prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-331
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume51
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2012

Fingerprint

Social Responsibility
Cannabis
Tobacco Products
Alcohols
Binge Drinking
Hallucinogens
Amphetamines
Barbiturates
Narcotics
Street Drugs
Insurance Benefits
Cocaine
Linear Models
Cohort Studies
Public Health
Parents
Logistic Models
Education
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Wray-Lake, Laura ; Maggs, Jennifer ; Johnston, Lloyd D. ; Bachman, Jerald G. ; O'Malley, Patrick M. ; Schulenberg, John E. / Associations between community attachments and adolescent substance use in nationally representative samples. In: Journal of Adolescent Health. 2012 ; Vol. 51, No. 4. pp. 325-331.
@article{ed9a3f6d1f1b435eb7b9d2351140ef8b,
title = "Associations between community attachments and adolescent substance use in nationally representative samples",
abstract = "Purpose: Social capital and social attachment theories of substance use argue that positive bonds to society and the conventional values they promote deter adolescents from substance use. Using nationally representative samples of U.S. high school seniors, we hypothesized that adolescents' community attachments, measured by social trust, social responsibility, and religiosity, would be negatively associated with lifetime and 30-day substance use. Method: We used repeated cross-sectional nationally representative high school senior data from 1976 to 2008 Monitoring the Future Study cohorts (weighted N = 64,246; 51.6{\%} female). Participation rate ranged from 77{\%} to 86{\%} across years. A series of multiple linear and logistic regressions examined unique associations of adolescents' social trust, social responsibility, and religiosity with lifetime and 30-day use of cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana, hallucinogens, cocaine, amphetamines, barbiturates, tranquilizers, and narcotics. Models controlled for gender, race, college aspirations, high school grades, parents' education, and survey year. Results: Social trust, social responsibility, and religiosity showed independent negative associations with use of cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana, and six other types of drugs. After accounting for controls, community attachments related to lower lifetime and past 30-day use. Associations were consistent across measures, except social responsibility was not associated with binge drinking or lifetime illicit drugs besides marijuana. Conclusions: Study strengths included nationally representative samples, diverse substance use measures, and inclusion of controls. We extend theory by suggesting that distinct aspects of adolescents' community attachments uniquely relate to lower substance use. Results suggest potential public health benefits of integrating promotion of community attachments with substance use prevention.",
author = "Laura Wray-Lake and Jennifer Maggs and Johnston, {Lloyd D.} and Bachman, {Jerald G.} and O'Malley, {Patrick M.} and Schulenberg, {John E.}",
year = "2012",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jadohealth.2011.12.030",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "51",
pages = "325--331",
journal = "Journal of Adolescent Health",
issn = "1054-139X",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "4",

}

Associations between community attachments and adolescent substance use in nationally representative samples. / Wray-Lake, Laura; Maggs, Jennifer; Johnston, Lloyd D.; Bachman, Jerald G.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Schulenberg, John E.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 51, No. 4, 01.10.2012, p. 325-331.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations between community attachments and adolescent substance use in nationally representative samples

AU - Wray-Lake, Laura

AU - Maggs, Jennifer

AU - Johnston, Lloyd D.

AU - Bachman, Jerald G.

AU - O'Malley, Patrick M.

AU - Schulenberg, John E.

PY - 2012/10/1

Y1 - 2012/10/1

N2 - Purpose: Social capital and social attachment theories of substance use argue that positive bonds to society and the conventional values they promote deter adolescents from substance use. Using nationally representative samples of U.S. high school seniors, we hypothesized that adolescents' community attachments, measured by social trust, social responsibility, and religiosity, would be negatively associated with lifetime and 30-day substance use. Method: We used repeated cross-sectional nationally representative high school senior data from 1976 to 2008 Monitoring the Future Study cohorts (weighted N = 64,246; 51.6% female). Participation rate ranged from 77% to 86% across years. A series of multiple linear and logistic regressions examined unique associations of adolescents' social trust, social responsibility, and religiosity with lifetime and 30-day use of cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana, hallucinogens, cocaine, amphetamines, barbiturates, tranquilizers, and narcotics. Models controlled for gender, race, college aspirations, high school grades, parents' education, and survey year. Results: Social trust, social responsibility, and religiosity showed independent negative associations with use of cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana, and six other types of drugs. After accounting for controls, community attachments related to lower lifetime and past 30-day use. Associations were consistent across measures, except social responsibility was not associated with binge drinking or lifetime illicit drugs besides marijuana. Conclusions: Study strengths included nationally representative samples, diverse substance use measures, and inclusion of controls. We extend theory by suggesting that distinct aspects of adolescents' community attachments uniquely relate to lower substance use. Results suggest potential public health benefits of integrating promotion of community attachments with substance use prevention.

AB - Purpose: Social capital and social attachment theories of substance use argue that positive bonds to society and the conventional values they promote deter adolescents from substance use. Using nationally representative samples of U.S. high school seniors, we hypothesized that adolescents' community attachments, measured by social trust, social responsibility, and religiosity, would be negatively associated with lifetime and 30-day substance use. Method: We used repeated cross-sectional nationally representative high school senior data from 1976 to 2008 Monitoring the Future Study cohorts (weighted N = 64,246; 51.6% female). Participation rate ranged from 77% to 86% across years. A series of multiple linear and logistic regressions examined unique associations of adolescents' social trust, social responsibility, and religiosity with lifetime and 30-day use of cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana, hallucinogens, cocaine, amphetamines, barbiturates, tranquilizers, and narcotics. Models controlled for gender, race, college aspirations, high school grades, parents' education, and survey year. Results: Social trust, social responsibility, and religiosity showed independent negative associations with use of cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana, and six other types of drugs. After accounting for controls, community attachments related to lower lifetime and past 30-day use. Associations were consistent across measures, except social responsibility was not associated with binge drinking or lifetime illicit drugs besides marijuana. Conclusions: Study strengths included nationally representative samples, diverse substance use measures, and inclusion of controls. We extend theory by suggesting that distinct aspects of adolescents' community attachments uniquely relate to lower substance use. Results suggest potential public health benefits of integrating promotion of community attachments with substance use prevention.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84866731838&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84866731838&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2011.12.030

DO - 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2011.12.030

M3 - Article

C2 - 22999832

AN - SCOPUS:84866731838

VL - 51

SP - 325

EP - 331

JO - Journal of Adolescent Health

JF - Journal of Adolescent Health

SN - 1054-139X

IS - 4

ER -