Associations Between Experience of Early Childhood Trauma and Impact on Obesity Status, Health, as Well as Perceptions of Obesity-Related Health Care

Manpreet S. Mundi, Ryan T. Hurt, Sean M. Phelan, David Bradley, Irina V. Haller, Katherine W. Bauer, Steven M. Bradley, Darrell R. Schroeder, Matthew M. Clark, Ivana T. Croghan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the association between obesity and history of childhood trauma in an effort to define implications for the provider-patient relationship and possible causes of failure of obesity treatment. Methods: Multisite survey developed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Learning Health Systems Obesity Cohort Workgroup consisting of 49 questions with 2 questions focusing on history of being a victim of childhood physical and/or sexual abuse was mailed to 19,964 overweight or obese patients. Data collection for this survey occurred from October 27, 2017, through March 1, 2018. Results: Among the 2211 surveys included in analysis, respondents reporting being a victim of childhood abuse increased significantly with obesity (23.6%, 26.0%, 29.1%, and 36.8% for overweight, class I, class II, and class III obesity, respectively; P<.001). A higher percentage of those who reported being a victim of childhood abuse noted that their weight issues began at an earlier age (P=.002) and were more likely to have weight-related comorbidities (P<.001), even after controlling for body mass index. Impacting physician counseling on weight loss, patients who were childhood victims of abuse reported lower self-esteem (P<.001), were more likely to feel judged by their health care providers (P=.009), and less likely to feel being treated with respect (P=.045). Conclusion: Overall, being a victim of childhood abuse was significantly associated with obesity, lower self-esteem and negative experiences interacting with health care providers. Health care providers should receive training to ensure open and nonjudgmental visits with obese patients and consider the role of trauma survivorship issues in patients’ development of obesity and health care experiences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)408-419
Number of pages12
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume96
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Associations Between Experience of Early Childhood Trauma and Impact on Obesity Status, Health, as Well as Perceptions of Obesity-Related Health Care'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this