Associations between superoxide dismutase, malondialdehyde and all-cause mortality in older adults: A community-based cohort study

Chen Mao, Jin Qiu Yuan, Yue Bin Lv, Xiang Gao, Zhao Xue Yin, Virginia Byers Kraus, Jie Si Luo, Choy Lye Chei, David Bruce Matchar, Yi Zeng, Xiao Ming Shi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Oxidative stress is an important theory of aging but population-based evidence has been lacking. This study aimed to evaluate the associations between biomarkers of oxidative stress, including plasma superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA), with all-cause mortality in older adults. Methods: This is a community-based cohort study of 2224 participants (women:1227, median age: 86 years). We included individuals aged 65 or above and with plasma SOD activity and/or MDA tests at baseline. We evaluated the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by multivariable Cox models. Results: We documented 858 deaths during six years of follow-up. There was a significant interaction effect of sex with the association between SOD activity and mortality (P < 0.001). Compared with the lowest quintile, the risk of all-cause mortality was inversely associated with increasing quintiles of plasma SOD activity in women(P-trend< 0.001), with adjusted HRs for the second through fifth quintiles of 0.73 (95% CI 0.53-1.02), 0.52(95% CI 0.38-0.72), 0.53(95% CI 0.39-0.73), and 0.48(95% CI 0.35-0.66). There were no significant associations between SOD activity and mortality in men (P-trend = 0.64), and between MDA and mortality in all participants (P-trend = 0.79). Conclusions: Increased activity of SOD was independently associated with lower all-cause mortality in older women but not in men. This epidemiological study lent support for the free radical/oxidative stress theory of aging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number104
JournalBMC Geriatrics
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2019

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Malondialdehyde
Superoxide Dismutase
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Mortality
Oxidative Stress
Population Dynamics
Proportional Hazards Models
Free Radicals
Epidemiologic Studies
Biomarkers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Mao, Chen ; Yuan, Jin Qiu ; Lv, Yue Bin ; Gao, Xiang ; Yin, Zhao Xue ; Kraus, Virginia Byers ; Luo, Jie Si ; Chei, Choy Lye ; Matchar, David Bruce ; Zeng, Yi ; Shi, Xiao Ming. / Associations between superoxide dismutase, malondialdehyde and all-cause mortality in older adults : A community-based cohort study. In: BMC Geriatrics. 2019 ; Vol. 19, No. 1.
@article{73563e6cd25749dd8843aec2157cc726,
title = "Associations between superoxide dismutase, malondialdehyde and all-cause mortality in older adults: A community-based cohort study",
abstract = "Background: Oxidative stress is an important theory of aging but population-based evidence has been lacking. This study aimed to evaluate the associations between biomarkers of oxidative stress, including plasma superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA), with all-cause mortality in older adults. Methods: This is a community-based cohort study of 2224 participants (women:1227, median age: 86 years). We included individuals aged 65 or above and with plasma SOD activity and/or MDA tests at baseline. We evaluated the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs) by multivariable Cox models. Results: We documented 858 deaths during six years of follow-up. There was a significant interaction effect of sex with the association between SOD activity and mortality (P < 0.001). Compared with the lowest quintile, the risk of all-cause mortality was inversely associated with increasing quintiles of plasma SOD activity in women(P-trend< 0.001), with adjusted HRs for the second through fifth quintiles of 0.73 (95{\%} CI 0.53-1.02), 0.52(95{\%} CI 0.38-0.72), 0.53(95{\%} CI 0.39-0.73), and 0.48(95{\%} CI 0.35-0.66). There were no significant associations between SOD activity and mortality in men (P-trend = 0.64), and between MDA and mortality in all participants (P-trend = 0.79). Conclusions: Increased activity of SOD was independently associated with lower all-cause mortality in older women but not in men. This epidemiological study lent support for the free radical/oxidative stress theory of aging.",
author = "Chen Mao and Yuan, {Jin Qiu} and Lv, {Yue Bin} and Xiang Gao and Yin, {Zhao Xue} and Kraus, {Virginia Byers} and Luo, {Jie Si} and Chei, {Choy Lye} and Matchar, {David Bruce} and Yi Zeng and Shi, {Xiao Ming}",
year = "2019",
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day = "15",
doi = "10.1186/s12877-019-1109-z",
language = "English (US)",
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Mao, C, Yuan, JQ, Lv, YB, Gao, X, Yin, ZX, Kraus, VB, Luo, JS, Chei, CL, Matchar, DB, Zeng, Y & Shi, XM 2019, 'Associations between superoxide dismutase, malondialdehyde and all-cause mortality in older adults: A community-based cohort study', BMC Geriatrics, vol. 19, no. 1, 104. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-019-1109-z

Associations between superoxide dismutase, malondialdehyde and all-cause mortality in older adults : A community-based cohort study. / Mao, Chen; Yuan, Jin Qiu; Lv, Yue Bin; Gao, Xiang; Yin, Zhao Xue; Kraus, Virginia Byers; Luo, Jie Si; Chei, Choy Lye; Matchar, David Bruce; Zeng, Yi; Shi, Xiao Ming.

In: BMC Geriatrics, Vol. 19, No. 1, 104, 15.04.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations between superoxide dismutase, malondialdehyde and all-cause mortality in older adults

T2 - A community-based cohort study

AU - Mao, Chen

AU - Yuan, Jin Qiu

AU - Lv, Yue Bin

AU - Gao, Xiang

AU - Yin, Zhao Xue

AU - Kraus, Virginia Byers

AU - Luo, Jie Si

AU - Chei, Choy Lye

AU - Matchar, David Bruce

AU - Zeng, Yi

AU - Shi, Xiao Ming

PY - 2019/4/15

Y1 - 2019/4/15

N2 - Background: Oxidative stress is an important theory of aging but population-based evidence has been lacking. This study aimed to evaluate the associations between biomarkers of oxidative stress, including plasma superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA), with all-cause mortality in older adults. Methods: This is a community-based cohort study of 2224 participants (women:1227, median age: 86 years). We included individuals aged 65 or above and with plasma SOD activity and/or MDA tests at baseline. We evaluated the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by multivariable Cox models. Results: We documented 858 deaths during six years of follow-up. There was a significant interaction effect of sex with the association between SOD activity and mortality (P < 0.001). Compared with the lowest quintile, the risk of all-cause mortality was inversely associated with increasing quintiles of plasma SOD activity in women(P-trend< 0.001), with adjusted HRs for the second through fifth quintiles of 0.73 (95% CI 0.53-1.02), 0.52(95% CI 0.38-0.72), 0.53(95% CI 0.39-0.73), and 0.48(95% CI 0.35-0.66). There were no significant associations between SOD activity and mortality in men (P-trend = 0.64), and between MDA and mortality in all participants (P-trend = 0.79). Conclusions: Increased activity of SOD was independently associated with lower all-cause mortality in older women but not in men. This epidemiological study lent support for the free radical/oxidative stress theory of aging.

AB - Background: Oxidative stress is an important theory of aging but population-based evidence has been lacking. This study aimed to evaluate the associations between biomarkers of oxidative stress, including plasma superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA), with all-cause mortality in older adults. Methods: This is a community-based cohort study of 2224 participants (women:1227, median age: 86 years). We included individuals aged 65 or above and with plasma SOD activity and/or MDA tests at baseline. We evaluated the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by multivariable Cox models. Results: We documented 858 deaths during six years of follow-up. There was a significant interaction effect of sex with the association between SOD activity and mortality (P < 0.001). Compared with the lowest quintile, the risk of all-cause mortality was inversely associated with increasing quintiles of plasma SOD activity in women(P-trend< 0.001), with adjusted HRs for the second through fifth quintiles of 0.73 (95% CI 0.53-1.02), 0.52(95% CI 0.38-0.72), 0.53(95% CI 0.39-0.73), and 0.48(95% CI 0.35-0.66). There were no significant associations between SOD activity and mortality in men (P-trend = 0.64), and between MDA and mortality in all participants (P-trend = 0.79). Conclusions: Increased activity of SOD was independently associated with lower all-cause mortality in older women but not in men. This epidemiological study lent support for the free radical/oxidative stress theory of aging.

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U2 - 10.1186/s12877-019-1109-z

DO - 10.1186/s12877-019-1109-z

M3 - Article

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