Associations of Taking Conflict Personally with Mental and Physical Health: An Allostatic Load Perspective

Timothy Ryan Worley, Lindsey Susan Aloia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Building from an allostatic load perspective, this study tested mental and physical health outcomes associated with taking conflict personally. Four hundred and thirty-seven students completed measures assessing direct personalization, persecution feelings, stress reactions, positive relational effects, negative relational effects, and like/dislike valence; mental health; and physical health. Persecution feelings and like/dislike valence were negatively associated with mental health; negative relational effects were positively associated with mental health; direct personalization and persecution feelings were negatively associated with physical health; and like/dislike valence was positively associated with physical health. Results indicated partial support for a model in which mental health mediated associations between taking conflict personally and physical health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-151
Number of pages11
JournalSouthern Communication Journal
Volume84
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 27 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication

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