Atmospheric dispersion of wheat rust spores

A new theoretical framework to interpret field data and estimate downwind dispersion

Marcelo Chamecki, Nicholas S. Dufault, Scott Alan Isard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Theoretical predictions for dispersion of heavy particles above an area source are used to formulate a new framework to interpret measurements of spore concentration above an infected field. Experimental measurements of mean spore concentration above an infected wheat field are used to validate theoretical predictions. The framework is then used to estimate total spore flux from the infected field and deposition patterns downwind. Results suggest that for the present case, consisting of a very low open canopy and friction velocity between 0.2 and 0.5 m s -1, the properties of the spore plume above the source field are mostly determined by the source strength (i.e., spore release rate) and are approximately independent of turbulence properties. Turbulence conditions have a strong effect on the distance downwind from the source traveled by spores, however, and are therefore critical in the spread of the disease. In addition, effects of spore clumping on dispersal are explored, illustrating the strong effect of clumping on reducing spore dispersal distance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)672-685
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology
Volume51
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

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rust disease
spore
wheat
turbulence
prediction
friction
plume
canopy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

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Atmospheric dispersion of wheat rust spores : A new theoretical framework to interpret field data and estimate downwind dispersion. / Chamecki, Marcelo; Dufault, Nicholas S.; Isard, Scott Alan.

In: Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, Vol. 51, No. 3, 01.03.2012, p. 672-685.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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