Atmospheric inputs of organic matter to a forested watershed

Variations from storm to storm over the seasons

Lidiia Iavorivska, Elizabeth Weeks Boyer, Matthew P. Miller, Michael G. Brown, Terrie Vasilopoulos, Jose Fuentes, Christopher J. Duffy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to determine the quantity and chemical composition of precipitation inputs of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to a forested watershed; and to characterize the associated temporal variability. We sampled most precipitation that occurred from May 2012 through August 2013 at the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (Pennsylvania, USA). Sub-event precipitation samples (159) were collected sequentially during 90 events; covering various types of synoptic meteorological conditions in all climatic seasons. Precipitation DOC concentrations and rates of wet atmospheric DOC deposition were highly variable from storm to storm, ranging from 0.3 to 5.6 mg C L−1 and from 0.5 to 32.8 mg C m−2 h−1, respectively. Seasonally, storms in spring and summer had higher concentrations of DOC and more optically active organic matter than in winter. Higher DOC concentrations resulted from weather types that favor air advection, where cold frontal systems, on average, delivered more than warm/stationary fronts and northeasters. A mixed modeling statistical approach revealed that factors related to storm properties, emission sources, and to the chemical composition of the atmosphere could explain more than 60% of the storm to storm variability in DOC concentrations. This study provided observations on changes in dissolved organic matter that can be useful in modeling of atmospheric oxidative chemistry, exploring relationships between organics and other elements of precipitation chemistry, and in considering temporal changes in ecosystem nutrient balances and microbial activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)284-295
Number of pages12
JournalAtmospheric Environment
Volume147
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Fingerprint

dissolved organic carbon
watershed
organic matter
chemical composition
precipitation (chemistry)
dissolved organic matter
microbial activity
modeling
shale
advection
observatory
weather
atmosphere
ecosystem
winter
air
summer

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

Iavorivska, Lidiia ; Boyer, Elizabeth Weeks ; Miller, Matthew P. ; Brown, Michael G. ; Vasilopoulos, Terrie ; Fuentes, Jose ; Duffy, Christopher J. / Atmospheric inputs of organic matter to a forested watershed : Variations from storm to storm over the seasons. In: Atmospheric Environment. 2016 ; Vol. 147. pp. 284-295.
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Atmospheric inputs of organic matter to a forested watershed : Variations from storm to storm over the seasons. / Iavorivska, Lidiia; Boyer, Elizabeth Weeks; Miller, Matthew P.; Brown, Michael G.; Vasilopoulos, Terrie; Fuentes, Jose; Duffy, Christopher J.

In: Atmospheric Environment, Vol. 147, 01.12.2016, p. 284-295.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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