Attachment Behavior of Deaf Children with Deaf Parents

KATHRYN P. MEADOW, MARK T. GREENBERG, CAROL ERTING

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Seventeen deaf children, all of whom have two deaf parents, were videotaped. Analyses of their behaviors indicated that they are comparable to children with normal hearing who have participated in research projects in the past. They are neither precocious nor are they delayed in their development of secure attachment to and independence from primary caregivers. Thus, children younger than age 3 were unwilling to consent to the parent's departure from the room and were distressed by the separation. Most of the children between ages 3 and 5 reached agreement about the plan for separation; only 1 showed distress while alone, and all were sociable upon reunion. Findings are compared with those of previous studies, and suggestions made for explanations of differences which emphasize the importance of the sociolinguistic environment for optimal development of deaf children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-28
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child Psychiatry
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1983

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Attachment Behavior of Deaf Children with Deaf Parents'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this