Attending to email

Benjamin V. Hanrahan, Manuel A. Pérez-Quiñones, David Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Email has become deeply embedded in many users' daily lives. To investigate how email features in users lives, particularly how users attend to email, we ran a 2-week study that logged interactions with email and gathered diary entries related to individual sessions. Our study showed that the majority of attentional effort is around reading email and participating in conversations, as opposed to email management (deleting, moving, flagging emails). We found that participants attended to email primarily based on notifications, instead of the number of unread messages in their inbox. We present our results through answering several questions, and leverage conversation analysis, particularly conversational openings, to explicate several issues. Our findings point to inefficiencies in email as a communication medium, mainly, around how summons are (or are not) issued. This results in an increased burden on email users to maintain engagement and determine (or construct) the appropriate moment for interruption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)253-272
Number of pages20
JournalInteracting with Computers
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

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Electronic mail
Communication

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction

Cite this

Hanrahan, B. V., Pérez-Quiñones, M. A., & Martin, D. (2016). Attending to email. Interacting with Computers, 28(3), 253-272. https://doi.org/10.1093/iwc/iwu048
Hanrahan, Benjamin V. ; Pérez-Quiñones, Manuel A. ; Martin, David. / Attending to email. In: Interacting with Computers. 2016 ; Vol. 28, No. 3. pp. 253-272.
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Hanrahan, BV, Pérez-Quiñones, MA & Martin, D 2016, 'Attending to email', Interacting with Computers, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 253-272. https://doi.org/10.1093/iwc/iwu048

Attending to email. / Hanrahan, Benjamin V.; Pérez-Quiñones, Manuel A.; Martin, David.

In: Interacting with Computers, Vol. 28, No. 3, 01.05.2016, p. 253-272.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Hanrahan BV, Pérez-Quiñones MA, Martin D. Attending to email. Interacting with Computers. 2016 May 1;28(3):253-272. https://doi.org/10.1093/iwc/iwu048