Attentional interference in judgments of musical timbre: Individual differences in working memory

Michael D. Hall, Dawn G. Blasko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Researchers have shown that working memory is related to a variety of high-level cognitive processes. However, the results of recent research have suggested that may be because of its role in attentional control. In the present experiment, the authors investigated that hypothesis by using an attentional interference task with musical stimuli. Listeners were asked to monitor one ear for either a clarinet or violin tone and to ignore any information in the other ear. On some of the trials, they heard only one tone and on other trials, either the same instrument in both ears or different instruments. Individual differences were measured in working memory and musical experience. The results showed more attentional interference in the different-instrument condition for participants with lower working memory scores, which suggested that working memory involves the ability to control attention to inhibit irrelevant information.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)94-112
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of General Psychology
Volume132
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gender Studies
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Attentional interference in judgments of musical timbre: Individual differences in working memory'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this