Attributions of responsibility for memory problems in older and younger adults

Janet E. McCracken, Jeffrey Hayes, Don Dell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated older and younger persons' responsibility attributions for the cause of and solution to a memory problem and, for comparison, a weight problem. Traditional college-age students (n = 116) and persons over 65 years of age (n = 98) read a vignette describing either a 25-year-old or 65-year-old who had a memory or weight problem. Results indicated that both the age of the help-seeker and problem type affected attributions. Specifically, the 65-year-old was perceived to be less responsible than the 25-year-old for the cause of and solution to a memory problem. In addition, help-seekers with a memory problem were held less responsible for causing and solving their problem than were help-seekers with a weight problem.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)385-391
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Counseling and Development
Volume75
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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Young Adult
Weights and Measures
Students

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

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Attributions of responsibility for memory problems in older and younger adults. / McCracken, Janet E.; Hayes, Jeffrey; Dell, Don.

In: Journal of Counseling and Development, Vol. 75, No. 5, 01.01.1997, p. 385-391.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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