Auditory brainstem responses of stutterers and nonstutterers during speech production

K. M. Smith, Ingrid Maria Blood, G. W. Blood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was designed to determine if significant, predictable stimulus-related variations in evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) could be documented between stuttering and nonstuttering adults during various verbal rehearsal tasks. ABRs were recorded while subjects were engaged in overt speech, whispering, silent articulation, and covert verbal rehearsal tasks. Results revealed that stutterers demonstrated significantly larger Wave I absolute amplitudes, and significantly larger Wave V to Wave I relative amplitude ratios (V/I) than nonstutterers. Such variations may serve to further an understanding of a possible relationship between dysfluent speech and central nervous system functioning. No significant differences were found between stuttering and nonstuttering subjects for absolute or interpeak latencies of the ABRs during the verbal rehearsal tasks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-222
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Fluency Disorders
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

Fingerprint

Brain Stem Auditory Evoked Potentials
Stuttering
stimulus
Central Nervous System
Rehearsal
Speech Production
Waves
Stutterers
Hearing

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Speech and Hearing
  • LPN and LVN

Cite this

Smith, K. M. ; Blood, Ingrid Maria ; Blood, G. W. / Auditory brainstem responses of stutterers and nonstutterers during speech production. In: Journal of Fluency Disorders. 1990 ; Vol. 15, No. 4. pp. 211-222.
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Auditory brainstem responses of stutterers and nonstutterers during speech production. / Smith, K. M.; Blood, Ingrid Maria; Blood, G. W.

In: Journal of Fluency Disorders, Vol. 15, No. 4, 01.01.1990, p. 211-222.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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