Autonomous robots in the fog of war

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The US Congress has mandated that by the year 2015, one-third of ground combat vehicles will be unmanned or autonomous, and the Department of Defense (DOD) is now developing a multitude of unmanned systems that it intends to rapidly field. This decision faces some challenges when interoperability becomes an issue as robots of different types must interact, even more difficult is getting manned and unmanned systems to interact. An autonomous robot needs to be able to automatically process the data from sensors, extract relevant information from those data, and then make decisions in real time based on that information and on quickly as it could. For a robot, the equivalent would be to conduct software simulations to tap the brain of the machine. A new way of testing autonomous systems is required that is statistically meaningful and also inspires confidence in the results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number5960163
JournalIEEE Spectrum
Volume48
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2011

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Fog
Robots
Ground vehicles
Interoperability
Brain
Sensors
Testing

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

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Autonomous robots in the fog of war. / Weiss, Lora G.

In: IEEE Spectrum, Vol. 48, No. 8, 5960163, 01.08.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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