Average American teenager? White working-class high school students navigate race, privilege and opportunity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Using findings from an interview-based ethnographic research study, this article explores the social identity development of white suburban high school students in a working-class area of north-eastern United States. Discussion focuses on the ways that ‘whiteness’ and ‘normality’ become conflated for these white working-class teens as they identify themselves as ‘average,’ ‘regular,’ and ‘normal,’ by enlisting neoliberal discourses of individuality, consumerism, and opportunity. I argue that these discourses of normality work to hide both the white privilege as well as the disadvantages the teens experience as a result of their working-class backgrounds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-138
Number of pages16
JournalSocial Identities
Volume20
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 4 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science

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