'B Seeing U' in unfamiliar places: ESL writers, email epistolaries, and critical computer literacy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article poses a rich, to date unexplored, resource for facilitating students' development of critical technological literacy: the email epistolary novel. With reference to a developmental writing class populated primarily by international English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) students, the article describes how the study of an email epistolary helped students to examine technology critically and made students' technological literacies a course emphasis. This approach to writing pedagogy, the article argues, illustrates how ESL students negotiate their technological literacies in the context of their assimilation into American undergraduate communities. The article concludes by suggesting that email epistolaries can guide students at all levels toward more nuanced understandings of how technological literacy emerges in dialogue with other literacy practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)237-249
Number of pages13
JournalComputers and Composition
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2004

Fingerprint

Electronic mail
literacy
writer
Students
language
student
assimilation
Writer
Electronic Mail
English as a Second Language
Computer Literacy
dialogue
Literacies
resources
community

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Education
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

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'B Seeing U' in unfamiliar places : ESL writers, email epistolaries, and critical computer literacy. / Rose, Jeanne Marie.

In: Computers and Composition, Vol. 21, No. 2, 01.06.2004, p. 237-249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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