Baclofen reduces fat intake under binge-type conditions

Ariel Buda-Levin, Francis H.E. Wojnicki, Rebecca L. Corwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Scopus citations

Abstract

The GABA-B agonist baclofen reduces drug self-administration in rats and has shown promise clinically in the treatment of substance abuse. Baclofen generally does not reduce food intake in non-binge feeding protocols. In this study, baclofen was tested in a fat-binge protocol. Thirty male rats were divided into three groups (B: binge; FM: fat-matched; C: chow). B received a bowl of vegetable shortening for 2 h on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday (MWF) and continuous access to powdered chow (regular chow) in all phases. FM had continuous access to a regular chow + shortening mixture (FM chow) that provided the same proportion of shortening and regular chow that the B rats consumed in all phases. In addition, FM had the following: phase 1: no separate bowl of shortening; phase 2: 2-h MWF access to a separate bowl of shortening; phase 3, daily 2-h access to a separate bowl of shortening; C rats had continuous access to the regular chow in all phases. In addition, C had the following: phase 1: no separate bowl of shortening; phase 2: 2-h MWF access to a separate bowl of shortening; in phase 3, daily 2-h access to a separate bowl of shortening. Baclofen (1.0, 1.8 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced shortening intake regardless of access condition. Baclofen had no effect on, or stimulated, FM and regular chow intake. These results demonstrate that baclofen can reduce fat intake in rats under binge-type conditions. Furthermore, these results indicate that bingeing, as modeled in our protocol, is different from other forms of food intake and may share similarities with substance abuse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)176-184
Number of pages9
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume86
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2005

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Baclofen reduces fat intake under binge-type conditions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Buda-Levin, A., Wojnicki, F. H. E., & Corwin, R. L. (2005). Baclofen reduces fat intake under binge-type conditions. Physiology and Behavior, 86(1-2), 176-184. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2005.07.020