Battlespace surveillance using netted wireless random noise radar systems

Shrawan C. Surender, Ram Mohan Narayanan

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Network-Centric Warfare (NCW) technology is currently being investigated to enhance the military's effectiveness in the battlespace by providing the warfighter the necessary information to take proper decisions and win wars. One of the main battlespace requirements is surveillance, especially in today's guerilla warfare theaters, such as the littoral and urban zones. NCW requires warfighters to be networked, self-organizing, spectrally undetectable, and having precise information about hostile targets in their vicinity. Towards this end, we are developing the concept of Netted Wireless Random Noise Radars, which is presented in this paper. The low probability-of-detection (LPD) and low probability-of-intercept (LPI) properties of random noise radars are well-known. Such radar sensors form a self-organizing networkcentric architecture, using a deterministically fragmented spectrum to avoid spectral fratricide. The central concept is to use notch filtering to fragment parts of the band-limited non-coherent random noise waveform spectrum, and use these intermediate bandwidths for network communication (target tracking and track fusion) among the wireless sensors. For target detection and ranging, these sensors transmit random noise waveforms combined with continuous signals carrying digital data. As seen by the hostile target, the transmitted waveform appears random and noise-like. However, for the friendly sensors of this system, the noise-like signal contains camouflaged information. The advantages being envisioned with such a system are lower probability of detection due to noise-like transmissions, mobility to sensors due to the self-organizing capability, spectral efficiency due to fragmentation of spectrum, and better immunity to coherent interference due to the use of non-coherent signal waveforms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number30
Pages (from-to)213-223
Number of pages11
JournalProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume5820
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2005

Fingerprint

Random Noise
Radar systems
random noise
surveillance
Waveform
Surveillance
Radar
radar
warfare
Self-organizing
Military operations
organizing
waveforms
Sensor
Probability of Detection
sensors
Sensors
Target tracking
Network Communication
Target

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

@article{cf5544f3809744638a3cc8d94eaee61e,
title = "Battlespace surveillance using netted wireless random noise radar systems",
abstract = "Network-Centric Warfare (NCW) technology is currently being investigated to enhance the military's effectiveness in the battlespace by providing the warfighter the necessary information to take proper decisions and win wars. One of the main battlespace requirements is surveillance, especially in today's guerilla warfare theaters, such as the littoral and urban zones. NCW requires warfighters to be networked, self-organizing, spectrally undetectable, and having precise information about hostile targets in their vicinity. Towards this end, we are developing the concept of Netted Wireless Random Noise Radars, which is presented in this paper. The low probability-of-detection (LPD) and low probability-of-intercept (LPI) properties of random noise radars are well-known. Such radar sensors form a self-organizing networkcentric architecture, using a deterministically fragmented spectrum to avoid spectral fratricide. The central concept is to use notch filtering to fragment parts of the band-limited non-coherent random noise waveform spectrum, and use these intermediate bandwidths for network communication (target tracking and track fusion) among the wireless sensors. For target detection and ranging, these sensors transmit random noise waveforms combined with continuous signals carrying digital data. As seen by the hostile target, the transmitted waveform appears random and noise-like. However, for the friendly sensors of this system, the noise-like signal contains camouflaged information. The advantages being envisioned with such a system are lower probability of detection due to noise-like transmissions, mobility to sensors due to the self-organizing capability, spectral efficiency due to fragmentation of spectrum, and better immunity to coherent interference due to the use of non-coherent signal waveforms.",
author = "Surender, {Shrawan C.} and Narayanan, {Ram Mohan}",
year = "2005",
month = "11",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1117/12.604183",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5820",
pages = "213--223",
journal = "Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering",
issn = "0277-786X",
publisher = "SPIE",

}

Battlespace surveillance using netted wireless random noise radar systems. / Surender, Shrawan C.; Narayanan, Ram Mohan.

In: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, Vol. 5820, 30, 15.11.2005, p. 213-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Battlespace surveillance using netted wireless random noise radar systems

AU - Surender, Shrawan C.

AU - Narayanan, Ram Mohan

PY - 2005/11/15

Y1 - 2005/11/15

N2 - Network-Centric Warfare (NCW) technology is currently being investigated to enhance the military's effectiveness in the battlespace by providing the warfighter the necessary information to take proper decisions and win wars. One of the main battlespace requirements is surveillance, especially in today's guerilla warfare theaters, such as the littoral and urban zones. NCW requires warfighters to be networked, self-organizing, spectrally undetectable, and having precise information about hostile targets in their vicinity. Towards this end, we are developing the concept of Netted Wireless Random Noise Radars, which is presented in this paper. The low probability-of-detection (LPD) and low probability-of-intercept (LPI) properties of random noise radars are well-known. Such radar sensors form a self-organizing networkcentric architecture, using a deterministically fragmented spectrum to avoid spectral fratricide. The central concept is to use notch filtering to fragment parts of the band-limited non-coherent random noise waveform spectrum, and use these intermediate bandwidths for network communication (target tracking and track fusion) among the wireless sensors. For target detection and ranging, these sensors transmit random noise waveforms combined with continuous signals carrying digital data. As seen by the hostile target, the transmitted waveform appears random and noise-like. However, for the friendly sensors of this system, the noise-like signal contains camouflaged information. The advantages being envisioned with such a system are lower probability of detection due to noise-like transmissions, mobility to sensors due to the self-organizing capability, spectral efficiency due to fragmentation of spectrum, and better immunity to coherent interference due to the use of non-coherent signal waveforms.

AB - Network-Centric Warfare (NCW) technology is currently being investigated to enhance the military's effectiveness in the battlespace by providing the warfighter the necessary information to take proper decisions and win wars. One of the main battlespace requirements is surveillance, especially in today's guerilla warfare theaters, such as the littoral and urban zones. NCW requires warfighters to be networked, self-organizing, spectrally undetectable, and having precise information about hostile targets in their vicinity. Towards this end, we are developing the concept of Netted Wireless Random Noise Radars, which is presented in this paper. The low probability-of-detection (LPD) and low probability-of-intercept (LPI) properties of random noise radars are well-known. Such radar sensors form a self-organizing networkcentric architecture, using a deterministically fragmented spectrum to avoid spectral fratricide. The central concept is to use notch filtering to fragment parts of the band-limited non-coherent random noise waveform spectrum, and use these intermediate bandwidths for network communication (target tracking and track fusion) among the wireless sensors. For target detection and ranging, these sensors transmit random noise waveforms combined with continuous signals carrying digital data. As seen by the hostile target, the transmitted waveform appears random and noise-like. However, for the friendly sensors of this system, the noise-like signal contains camouflaged information. The advantages being envisioned with such a system are lower probability of detection due to noise-like transmissions, mobility to sensors due to the self-organizing capability, spectral efficiency due to fragmentation of spectrum, and better immunity to coherent interference due to the use of non-coherent signal waveforms.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=27644556336&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=27644556336&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1117/12.604183

DO - 10.1117/12.604183

M3 - Conference article

VL - 5820

SP - 213

EP - 223

JO - Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering

JF - Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering

SN - 0277-786X

M1 - 30

ER -