BCATm deficiency ameliorates endotoxin-induced decrease in muscle protein synthesis and improves survival in septic mice

Charles H. Lang, Christopher J. Lynch, Thomas C. Vary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Endotoxin (LPS) and sepsis decrease mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity in skeletal muscle, thereby reducing protein synthesis. Our study tests the hypothesis that inhibition of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolism, which elevates circulating BCAA and stimulates mTOR, will blunt the LPS-induced decrease in muscle protein synthesis. Wild-type (WT) and mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm) knockout mice were studied 4 h after Escherichia coli LPS or saline. Basal skeletal muscle protein synthesis was increased in knockout mice compared with WT, and this change was associated with increased eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)-4E binding protein-1 (4E-BP1) phosphorylation, eIF4E·eIF4G binding, 4E-BP1·raptor binding, and eIF3·raptor binding without a change in the mTOR·raptor complex in muscle. LPS decreased muscle protein synthesis in WT mice, a change associated with decreased 4E-BP1 phosphorylation as well as decreased formation of eIF4E·eIF4G, 4E-BP1·raptor, and eIF3·raptor complexes. In BCATm knockout mice given LPS, muscle protein synthesis only decreased to values found in vehicle-treated WT control mice, and this ameliorated LPS effect was associated with a coordinate increase in 4E-BP1·raptor, eIF3·raptor, and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation. Additionally, the LPS-induced increase in muscle cytokines was blunted in BCATm knockout mice, compared with WT animals. In a separate study, 7-day survival and muscle mass were increased in BCATm knockout vs. WT mice after polymicrobial peritonitis. These data suggest that elevating blood BCAA is sufficient to ameliorate the catabolic effect of LPS on skeletal muscle protein synthesis via alterations in protein-protein interactions within mTOR complex-1, and this may provide a survival advantage in response to bacterial infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)R935-R944
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume299
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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