Before the Bright Star: football in the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

South Sudan’s independence was accompanied by the creation of a new national football team and its entry into the Federation of International Football Association (FIFA). Despite Sudan’s football history, there has not been much inquiry into the game’s growth and importance in Southern Sudan. This article analyzes football’s development in Southern Sudan during the Anglo-Egyptian Condominium era (1899–1956). In Northern Sudan it was featured in Khartoum’s Gordon College and the Sudan Football Association. In the South, football was played at Christian mission sites; locations that aimed to challenge the spread of Islam. As the British sought to separate the North from the South, the encouragement of football in each region was a point of unity in a divisive colonial agenda; one that planted seeds of conflict for the postcolonial state.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)735-753
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Eastern African Studies
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2018

Fingerprint

Sudan
South Sudan
condominium
federation
Islam
Football
Egyptians
history

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology
  • History
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

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Before the Bright Star : football in the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan. / Tounsel, Christopher Gallien.

In: Journal of Eastern African Studies, Vol. 12, No. 4, 02.10.2018, p. 735-753.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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