Behavioral correlates of the thalamic gustatory area

Ralph Norgren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fine wire electrodes were guided into the vicinity of the thalamic gustatory area by recording multi-unit responses to thermal and gustatory stimulation of the tongue. The electrodes were permanently implanted and retested with similar stimuli approximately one month postoperatively. After the electrophysiological test, each electrode was tested for self-stimulation, escape and evoked behavior. Intracranial electrical stimulation more frequently elicited mouth movements from electrodes which recorded responses to tongue stimulation, than those which did not. Only a small proportion of the electrodes which recorded responses to cold water, or to cold water and NaCl were aversive when tested for escape behavior. All the electrodes responding only to NaCl were aversive. None of the positively reinforcing electrodes responded to tongue stimuli.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-230
Number of pages10
JournalBrain research
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 27 1970

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Electrodes
Tongue
Self Stimulation
Water
Electric Stimulation
Mouth
Hot Temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Norgren, Ralph. / Behavioral correlates of the thalamic gustatory area. In: Brain research. 1970 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 221-230.
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Behavioral correlates of the thalamic gustatory area. / Norgren, Ralph.

In: Brain research, Vol. 22, No. 2, 27.08.1970, p. 221-230.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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