Best practices for promoting cycling amongst university students and employees

Oliver Wilson, Nicole Vairo, Melissa Jean Bopp, Dangaia Sims, Katherine Dutt, Brooke Pinkos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The benefits of active commuting (walking and biking to work) are well documented, though rates of participation remain low in the United States. University policies, programs and environments significantly influence student and employee's travel mode choice, though relatively little is known about appropriate strategies. Therefore, this study's purpose was to examine the best practices universities could implement in order to increase student and employee active commuting, focusing specifically on cycling. Universities designated as bicycle-friendly were interviewed to examine how they addressed engineering, encouragement, education, evaluation, and enforcement for cycling. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded. Universities (n = 17) ranged in size (small to large), bike-friendliness designation levels (bronze, silver, gold or platinum), and geographic location. Universities reported the following as promoting/facilitating cycling: quality bicycling infrastructure connecting campus and surrounding areas, various educational initiatives and resources, bike share accessibility, a written bike plan and regular transportation surveys, and secure bicycle storage areas and theft deterrents. The interaction between the university and community to support cycling on different levels was also noted as important. Findings provide a foundation for universities aiming to increase bike-friendliness for students and employees and inform future active commuting interventions on college campuses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)234-243
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Transport and Health
Volume9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

Fingerprint

Practice Guidelines
best practice
Bicycles
bicycle
employee
Personnel
Students
university
university policy
student
Bicycling
larceny
Bronze
Engineering education
Theft
gold
Geographic Locations
Platinum
Silver
Gold

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Transportation
  • Pollution
  • Safety Research
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Wilson, Oliver ; Vairo, Nicole ; Bopp, Melissa Jean ; Sims, Dangaia ; Dutt, Katherine ; Pinkos, Brooke. / Best practices for promoting cycling amongst university students and employees. In: Journal of Transport and Health. 2018 ; Vol. 9. pp. 234-243.
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Best practices for promoting cycling amongst university students and employees. / Wilson, Oliver; Vairo, Nicole; Bopp, Melissa Jean; Sims, Dangaia; Dutt, Katherine; Pinkos, Brooke.

In: Journal of Transport and Health, Vol. 9, 01.06.2018, p. 234-243.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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