Best practices for robotic surgery programs

Stephanie J. Estes, David Goldenberg, Joshua S. Winder, Ryan M. Juza, Jerome R. Lyn-Sue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Robotic surgical programs are increasing in number. Efficient methods by which to monitor and evaluate robotic surgery teams are needed. Methods: Best practices for an academic university medical center were created and instituted in 2009 and continue to the present. These practices have led to programmatic development that has resulted in a process that effectively monitors leadership team members; attending, resident, fellow, and staff training; credentialing; safety metrics; efficiency; and case volume recommendations. Results: Guidelines for hospitals and robotic directors that can be applied to one’s own robotic surgical services are included with examples of management of all aspects of a multispecialty robotic surgery program. Conclusion: The use of these best practices will ensure a robotic surgery program that is successful and well positioned for a safe and productive environment for current clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere2016.00102
JournalJournal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

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Robotics
Practice Guidelines
Credentialing
Guidelines
Safety

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

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Best practices for robotic surgery programs. / Estes, Stephanie J.; Goldenberg, David; Winder, Joshua S.; Juza, Ryan M.; Lyn-Sue, Jerome R.

In: Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons, Vol. 21, No. 2, e2016.00102, 01.04.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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