Between-person and within-person approaches to the prediction of ambulatory blood pressure: the role of affective valence and intensity

Matthew J. Zawadzki, Jennifer Mendiola, Eric A. Walle, William Gerin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Identifying momentary influences on ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) will help explain ABP variability; however, most research only examines aggregate ABP at the between-person level. This study used within-person methods to examine whether affective dimensions—valence and arousal—differentially predicted momentary ABP levels. A community sample (n = 39) wore an ABP cuff that took BP measurements every 20 min for 24 h. At each measurement, participants reported levels of valence and arousal on electronic diaries. Multilevel modeling was used to examine the effects of momentary and person-averaged levels of valence and arousal on ABP. Greater momentary negative valence and arousal predicted higher systolic BP compared to more positive or lower arousal assessments; higher averaged levels of arousal predicted higher DBP. The results suggest the independence of the effects of valence and arousal on BP. These findings have important implications for designing interventions to lower ABP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)757-766
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume39
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

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Arousal
Blood Pressure
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Zawadzki, Matthew J. ; Mendiola, Jennifer ; Walle, Eric A. ; Gerin, William. / Between-person and within-person approaches to the prediction of ambulatory blood pressure : the role of affective valence and intensity. In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 39, No. 5. pp. 757-766.
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Between-person and within-person approaches to the prediction of ambulatory blood pressure : the role of affective valence and intensity. / Zawadzki, Matthew J.; Mendiola, Jennifer; Walle, Eric A.; Gerin, William.

In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 39, No. 5, 01.10.2016, p. 757-766.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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