Between science and nature

Interpreting lactation failure in Elizabeth von Arnim's The Pastor's Wife

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Interpreting a scene of lactation failure allows us to represent breast-feeding as a contested social practice. This essay reads a novelistic scene of lactation failure in the context of the decline of breast-feeding in the twentieth century. The protagonist's ignorance of the "female" experiences of pregnancy, childbirth, and lactation is an effect of her objectification within the opposition between "science" and "nature." "Unnatural" as a woman because she is a "natural" individual, the "pastor's wife" exemplifies the dilemmas of breast-feeding as a biosocial practice of maternity in a technological society which features the breakdown of traditional female networks in which knowledge about maternity and breast-feeding are circulated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)101-115
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Medical Humanities
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

Fingerprint

Clergy
Breast Feeding
Spouses
Lactation
wife
objectification
science
pregnancy
opposition
twentieth century
experience
Parturition
Pregnancy
Society

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

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Between science and nature : Interpreting lactation failure in Elizabeth von Arnim's The Pastor's Wife. / Hausman, Bernice L.

In: Journal of Medical Humanities, Vol. 20, No. 2, 01.01.1999, p. 101-115.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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