Beverage caffeine intakes in young children

In Canada and the US

Carol A. Knight, Ian Knight, Diane Crisman Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Throughout childhood there is a shift from predominantly milk-based beverage consumption to other types of beverages, including those containing caffeine. Although a variety of health effects in children and adults have been attributed to caffeine, few data exist on caffeine intake in children aged one to five years. Methods: Because beverages provide about 80% of total caffeine consumed in children of this age group, beverage consumption patterns and caffeine intakes were evaluated from two beverage marketing surveys: the 2001 Canadian Facts study and the 1999 United States Share of Intake Panel study. Results: Considerably fewer Canadian children than American children consume caffeinated beverages (36% versus 56%); Canadian children consume approximately half the amount of caffeine (7 versus 14 mg/day in American children). Differences were largely because of higher intakes of carbonated soft drinks in the US. Conclusions: Caffeine intakes from caffeinated beverages remain well within safe levels for consumption by young children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)96-99
Number of pages4
JournalCanadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
Volume67
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2006

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Beverages
Caffeine
Canada
Carbonated Beverages
Marketing
Milk
Age Groups
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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Beverage caffeine intakes in young children : In Canada and the US. / Knight, Carol A.; Knight, Ian; Mitchell, Diane Crisman.

In: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Vol. 67, No. 2, 01.06.2006, p. 96-99.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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