Beverage intake of girls at age 5 y predicts adiposity and weight status in childhood and adolescence

Laura M. Fiorito, Michele Marini, Lori A. Francis, Helen Smiciklas-Wright, Leann L. Birch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

126 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Increased consumption of sweetened beverage has been linked to higher energy intake and adiposity in childhood. Objective: The objective was to assess whether beverage intake at age 5 y predicted energy intake, adiposity, and weight status across childhood and adolescence. Design: Participants were part of a longitudinal study of non-Hispanic white girls and their parents (n = 170) who were assessed biennially from age 5 to 15 y. At each assessment, beverage intake (milk, fruit juice, and sweetened beverages) and energy intake were assessed by using three 24-h recalls. Percentage body fat and waist circumference were measured. Height and weight were measured and used to calculate body mass index. Multiple regression analyses were used to predict the girls' adiposity. In addition, at age 5 y, girls were categorized as consuming <1, ≥1 and <2, or ≥2 servings of sweetened beverages. A mixed modeling approach was used to assess longitudinal differences and patterns of change in sweetened beverage and energy intake, adiposity, and weight status by frequency of sweetened beverage intake. Results: Sweetened beverage intake at age 5 y, but not milk or fruit juice intake, was positively associated with adiposity from age 5 to 15 y. Greater consumption of sweetened beverages at age 5 y (≥2 servings/d) was associated with a higher percentage body fat, waist circumference, and weight status from age 5 to 15 y. Conclusion: These findings provide new longitudinal evidence that early intake of sweetened beverages predicts adiposity and weight status across childhood and adolescence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)935-942
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume90
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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