Beyond broadband access: Developing data-based information policy strategies

Richard D. Taylor, Amit M. Schejter

Research output: Book/ReportBook

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

After broadband access, what next? What role do metrics play in understanding "information societies"? And, more importantly, in shaping their policies? Beyond counting people with broadband access, how can economic and social metrics inform broadband policies, help evaluate their outcomes, and create useful models for achieving national goals? Broadly described, this book addresses those questions. Information metrics are important, and often political. For example, what does it mean that one economy is ranked higher than another on a list of some e-measure? Any deeper understanding of a complex, multi-dimensional set of variables based on extensive data is lost in an international game of "we're better than you are" or asking "how can we catch up?" While there is broad international consensus that policy decisions are improved if they are informed by empirical data, there is no accepted standard as to which data matters. Many possible information indicators have been measured. But standing alone, what do they tell us? Which ones are important? Does their selection predetermine certain outcomes? Can they be transformed into truly useful policy tools? How do we know which data to collect, unless there are identified goals? This book is divided into two parts - the first deals with theoretical aspects of measuring information and the issues that should be taken into consideration when designing broadband-focused information policy; while the second demonstrates how data has been both used and abused for argumentation purposes with regards to choices among different policy paths.

Original languageEnglish (US)
PublisherFordham University Press
Number of pages311
ISBN (Print)9780823251834
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013

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information policy
information society
argumentation
economy
economics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

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Beyond broadband access : Developing data-based information policy strategies. / Taylor, Richard D.; Schejter, Amit M.

Fordham University Press, 2013. 311 p.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

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