Beyond objectivity: The performance impact of the perceived ability to learn and solve problems

Michael J. Tews, John W. Michel, Raymond A. Noe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to develop and provide initial validation evidence for the performance impact of a measure of an individual's perceived ability to learn and solve problems (PALS). Building on the self-efficacy literature and the importance of learning and problem solving, the fundamental premise of this research was that PALS would significantly explain employee performance. In addition to demonstrating that PALS represented a distinct construct, PALS was a significant predictor of performance for managerial and entry-level employees in two different organizational contexts. Moreover, PALS explained additional variance in performance beyond general mental ability, personality, and similar constructs related to learning and problem solving.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)484-495
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Vocational Behavior
Volume79
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2011

Fingerprint

Aptitude
objectivity
ability
performance
employee
Learning
entry level
Self Efficacy
Research
learning
self-efficacy
Personality
Objectivity
personality
evidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

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Beyond objectivity : The performance impact of the perceived ability to learn and solve problems. / Tews, Michael J.; Michel, John W.; Noe, Raymond A.

In: Journal of Vocational Behavior, Vol. 79, No. 2, 01.10.2011, p. 484-495.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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