Beyond the heteroepitaxial quantum dot: Self-assembling complex nanostructures controlled by strain and growth kinetics

Jennifer Lynn Gray, R. Hull, Chi Hang Lam, P. Sutter, J. Means, J. A. Floro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Heteroepitaxial growth of GeSi alloys on Si (001) under deposition conditions that partially limit surface mobility leads to an unusual form of strain-induced surface morphological evolution. We discuss a kinetic growth regime wherein pits form in a thick metastable wetting layer and, with additional deposition, evolve to a quantum dot molecule-a symmetric assembly of four quantum dots bound by the central pit. We discuss the size selection and scaling of quantum dot molecules. We then examine the key mechanism-preferred pit formation-in detail, using ex situ atomic force microscopy, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy, and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. A picture emerges wherein localized pits appear to arise from a damped instability. When pits are annealed, they extend into an array of highly anisotropic surface grooves via a one-dimensional growth instability. Subsequent deposition on this grooved film results in a fascinating structure where compact quantum dots and molecules, as well as highly ramified quantum wires, are all simultaneously self-assembled.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number155323
JournalPhysical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics
Volume72
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2005

Fingerprint

Growth kinetics
assembling
Semiconductor quantum dots
Nanostructures
quantum dots
kinetics
Molecules
Semiconductor quantum wires
Scanning tunneling microscopy
molecules
Epitaxial growth
Wetting
Atomic force microscopy
quantum wires
grooves
wetting
scanning tunneling microscopy
assembly
atomic force microscopy
scaling

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

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Beyond the heteroepitaxial quantum dot : Self-assembling complex nanostructures controlled by strain and growth kinetics. / Gray, Jennifer Lynn; Hull, R.; Lam, Chi Hang; Sutter, P.; Means, J.; Floro, J. A.

In: Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, Vol. 72, No. 15, 155323, 15.10.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T2 - Self-assembling complex nanostructures controlled by strain and growth kinetics

AU - Gray, Jennifer Lynn

AU - Hull, R.

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AU - Sutter, P.

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AU - Floro, J. A.

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