Bidirectional, Temporal Associations of Sleep with Positive Events, Affect, and Stressors in Daily Life Across a Week

Nancy L. Sin, David M. Almeida, Tori L. Crain, Ellen Ernst Kossek, Lisa F. Berkman, Orfeu M. Buxton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Sleep is intricately tied to emotional well-being, yet little is known about the reciprocal links between sleep and psychosocial experiences in the context of daily life. Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate daily psychosocial experiences (positive and negative affect, positive events, and stressors) as predictors of same-night sleep quality and duration, in addition to the reversed associations of nightly sleep predicting next-day experiences. Methods: Daily experiences and self-reported sleep were assessed via telephone interviews for eight consecutive evenings in two replicate samples of US employees (131 higher-income professionals and 181 lower-income hourly workers). Multilevel models evaluated within-person associations of daily experiences with sleep quality and duration. Analyses controlled for demographics, insomnia symptoms, the previous day’s experiences and sleep measures, and additional day-level covariates. Results: Daily positive experiences were associated with improved as well as disrupted subsequent sleep. Specifically, positive events at home predicted better sleep quality in both samples, whereas greater positive affect was associated with shorter sleep duration among the higher-income professionals. Negative affect and stressors were unrelated to subsequent sleep. Results for the reversed direction revealed that better sleep quality (and, to a lesser degree, longer sleep duration) predicted emotional well-being and lower odds of encountering stressors on the following day. Conclusions: Given the reciprocal relationships between sleep and daily experiences, efforts to improve well-being in daily life should reflect the importance of sleep.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)402-415
Number of pages14
JournalAnnals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume51
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Bidirectional, Temporal Associations of Sleep with Positive Events, Affect, and Stressors in Daily Life Across a Week'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this