Big brother as a contract monitor: An assessment of the use of contract staff to monitor offender communications

Ricki Dale Dierenfeldt, Jr., Greg Lindsteadt, Jacob Laan, Kristen N. Sobba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The privatization of prison services is a growing trend in the field of corrections; however, this growth has not been matched by evaluative research. This study examines the use of contract staff to supplement state intelligence investigators’ efforts to monitor outgoing offender telephone communications for evidence of illicit activity at 18 adult institutions in a Midwestern department of corrections. Percent-change models and Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) modeling are used to examine aggregates of intelligence reports documenting drug, expressive, instrumental, and administrative violations. Our findings indicate that the introduction of contract services was associated with substantial increases in the number of intelligence reports filed within each of these categories. Furthermore, these results suggest that the use of privatized services that supplement rather than replace public efforts appear to be an ethical, efficient, and cost-effective alternative to comprehensive privatization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-295
Number of pages17
JournalAmerican Journal of Criminal Justice
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 4 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Law

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Big brother as a contract monitor: An assessment of the use of contract staff to monitor offender communications'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this