Biketivism and technology: Historical reflections and appropriations

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In Western society bicycling is commonly perceived as either a sport, a form of leisure, an activity for children, or at best, a utilitarian transportation technology. In this paper, I contest these assumptions by discussing ways in which both bicycling and bicycle technologies are politicized as a response to the cultural, social and political norms of Western society. Through historical examples that include 19th century Socialists, 'first wave feminists, and 1960's Dutch Anarchists, I provide a theoretical context in which one can understand how present day activists appropriate the bicycle through a dialectic of action and communication. In short, I demonstrate how a seemingly neutral technology (the bicycle) and an everyday activity (bicycling can be utilized as tools for dissent, protest, and cultural critique.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)401-417
Number of pages17
JournalSocial Epistemology
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

Fingerprint

bicycle
Political Norms
dialectics
protest
Sports
communication
present
Appropriation
Society
Western Societies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Philosophy
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

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Biketivism and technology : Historical reflections and appropriations. / Furness, Zachary M.

In: Social Epistemology, Vol. 19, No. 4, 01.12.2005, p. 401-417.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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