Bilaterian Giant Ankyrins Have a Common Evolutionary Origin and Play a Conserved Role in Patterning the Axon Initial Segment

Timothy Jegla, Michelle M. Nguyen, Chengye Feng, Daniel J. Goetschius, Esteban Luna, Damian B. van Rossum, Bishoy Kamel, Aditya Pisupati, Elliott S. Milner, Melissa M. Rolls

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In vertebrate neurons, the axon initial segment (AIS) is specialized for action potential initiation. It is organized by a giant 480 Kd variant of ankyrin G (AnkG) that serves as an anchor for ion channels and is required for a plasma membrane diffusion barrier that excludes somatodendritic proteins from the axon. An unusually long exon required to encode this 480Kd variant is thought to have been inserted only recently during vertebrate evolution, so the giant ankyrin-based AIS scaffold has been viewed as a vertebrate adaptation for fast, precise signaling. We re-examined AIS evolution through phylogenomic analysis of ankyrins and by testing the role of ankyrins in proximal axon organization in a model multipolar Drosophila neuron (ddaE). We find giant isoforms of ankyrin in all major bilaterian phyla, and present evidence in favor of a single common origin for giant ankyrins and the corresponding long exon in a bilaterian ancestor. This finding raises the question of whether giant ankyrin isoforms play a conserved role in AIS organization throughout the Bilateria. We examined this possibility by looking for conserved ankyrin-dependent AIS features in Drosophila ddaE neurons via live imaging. We found that ddaE neurons have an axonal diffusion barrier proximal to the cell body that requires a giant isoform of the neuronal ankyrin Ank2. Furthermore, the potassium channel shal concentrates in the proximal axon in an Ank2-dependent manner. Our results indicate that the giant ankyrin-based cytoskeleton of the AIS may have evolved prior to the radiation of extant bilaterian lineages, much earlier than previously thought.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1006457
JournalPLoS genetics
Volume12
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2016

Fingerprint

Ankyrins
ankyrins
axons
vertebrate
anchor
ancestry
neurons
Axons
Vertebrates
Neurons
potassium
Protein Isoforms
membrane
vertebrates
plasma
protein
ion
Drosophila
exons
Shal Potassium Channels

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Jegla, Timothy ; Nguyen, Michelle M. ; Feng, Chengye ; Goetschius, Daniel J. ; Luna, Esteban ; van Rossum, Damian B. ; Kamel, Bishoy ; Pisupati, Aditya ; Milner, Elliott S. ; Rolls, Melissa M. / Bilaterian Giant Ankyrins Have a Common Evolutionary Origin and Play a Conserved Role in Patterning the Axon Initial Segment. In: PLoS genetics. 2016 ; Vol. 12, No. 12.
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Bilaterian Giant Ankyrins Have a Common Evolutionary Origin and Play a Conserved Role in Patterning the Axon Initial Segment. / Jegla, Timothy; Nguyen, Michelle M.; Feng, Chengye; Goetschius, Daniel J.; Luna, Esteban; van Rossum, Damian B.; Kamel, Bishoy; Pisupati, Aditya; Milner, Elliott S.; Rolls, Melissa M.

In: PLoS genetics, Vol. 12, No. 12, e1006457, 12.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Jegla, Timothy

AU - Nguyen, Michelle M.

AU - Feng, Chengye

AU - Goetschius, Daniel J.

AU - Luna, Esteban

AU - van Rossum, Damian B.

AU - Kamel, Bishoy

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AU - Rolls, Melissa M.

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