Bim implementation in facilities management: An analysis of implementation processes

Saratu Terreno, Chimay Anumba, Somayeh Asadi

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

The potential of Building Information Modeling (BIM) to add value to Facilities Management (FM) has long been recognized. The usefulness of BIM in asset management, including operations and maintenance has been described by numerous authors. Crucial to its implementation is the integration of information, which increases efficiency and productivity on the job and, in turn, positively impacts the primary organization's mission and goals. In view of the potential of BIM to add value to FM which in turn can boost the mission of organizations, there is a potential to study the experiences of early adopters, map out patterns and differences and to record lessons learned. This research aims to investigate how BIM is implemented in operations, how value can be derived and what the critical success factors are. What are the areas of process waste and consequent loss of value within the lifecycle phases of facilities? To this effect, the case study of a large tertiary educational institution is undertaken, mapping the processes of information flow between the BIM project team and the facilities management department during and after construction. Process mapping of organizational processes will identify areas of potential waste or non-value-adding activities, and also areas of potential value-adding opportunities. By studying BIM value through the lifecycle value chain, and identifying best practices and challenges in light of the more subjective nature of value delivery in FM, more impactful outcomes should be derived.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages309-318
Number of pages10
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
Event6th CSCE-CRC International Construction Specialty Conference 2017 - Held as Part of the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering Annual Conference and General Meeting 2017 - Vancouver, Canada
Duration: May 31 2017Jun 3 2017

Conference

Conference6th CSCE-CRC International Construction Specialty Conference 2017 - Held as Part of the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering Annual Conference and General Meeting 2017
CountryCanada
CityVancouver
Period5/31/176/3/17

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Asset management
Productivity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction

Cite this

Terreno, S., Anumba, C., & Asadi, S. (2017). Bim implementation in facilities management: An analysis of implementation processes. 309-318. Paper presented at 6th CSCE-CRC International Construction Specialty Conference 2017 - Held as Part of the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering Annual Conference and General Meeting 2017, Vancouver, Canada.
Terreno, Saratu ; Anumba, Chimay ; Asadi, Somayeh. / Bim implementation in facilities management : An analysis of implementation processes. Paper presented at 6th CSCE-CRC International Construction Specialty Conference 2017 - Held as Part of the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering Annual Conference and General Meeting 2017, Vancouver, Canada.10 p.
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Terreno, S, Anumba, C & Asadi, S 2017, 'Bim implementation in facilities management: An analysis of implementation processes' Paper presented at 6th CSCE-CRC International Construction Specialty Conference 2017 - Held as Part of the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering Annual Conference and General Meeting 2017, Vancouver, Canada, 5/31/17 - 6/3/17, pp. 309-318.

Bim implementation in facilities management : An analysis of implementation processes. / Terreno, Saratu; Anumba, Chimay; Asadi, Somayeh.

2017. 309-318 Paper presented at 6th CSCE-CRC International Construction Specialty Conference 2017 - Held as Part of the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering Annual Conference and General Meeting 2017, Vancouver, Canada.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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Terreno S, Anumba C, Asadi S. Bim implementation in facilities management: An analysis of implementation processes. 2017. Paper presented at 6th CSCE-CRC International Construction Specialty Conference 2017 - Held as Part of the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering Annual Conference and General Meeting 2017, Vancouver, Canada.