Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) in Tissue Culture and in Developing Tissues of Drosophila to Study Protein-Protein Interactions

Yurika Matsui, Zhi-chun Lai

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Protein-protein interactions provide a common mechanism for regulating protein functions and also serve as the fundamental step of many biochemical reactions. To accurately determine the involvement and function of protein-protein interactions, it is crucial to detect the interactions with the minimum number of artifacts. In this chapter, we report the method of bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) in tissue culture and developing tissues of Drosophila, which allows the visualization of subcellular localization of protein-protein interactions in living cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMethods in Molecular Biology
PublisherHumana Press Inc.
Pages75-85
Number of pages11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Publication series

NameMethods in Molecular Biology
Volume1893
ISSN (Print)1064-3745

Fingerprint

Drosophila
Fluorescence
Proteins
Artifacts

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Matsui, Yurika ; Lai, Zhi-chun. / Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) in Tissue Culture and in Developing Tissues of Drosophila to Study Protein-Protein Interactions. Methods in Molecular Biology. Humana Press Inc., 2019. pp. 75-85 (Methods in Molecular Biology).
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Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) in Tissue Culture and in Developing Tissues of Drosophila to Study Protein-Protein Interactions. / Matsui, Yurika; Lai, Zhi-chun.

Methods in Molecular Biology. Humana Press Inc., 2019. p. 75-85 (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 1893).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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