Bioactive compounds of grapefruit (Citrus paradisi cv. rio red) respond differently to postharvest irradiation, storage, and freeze drying

Jairam Vanamala, Greg Cobb, Nancy D. Turner, Joanne R. Lupton, Kil Sun Yoo, Leonard M. Pike, Bhimanagouda S. Patil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the present study, the effect of irradiation, storage, and freeze drying on grapefruit bioactive compounds was investigated. Grapefruits were exposed to one of two irradiation doses: 0 (control) or 300 Gy ( 137Cs, a proposed treatment against fruit flies) and then stored for up to 6 days. At the last storage time point (6 days after harvest), grapefruit pulp from control and irradiated fruits was freeze-dried. Bioactive compounds were extracted from Rio Red grapefruit pulp and analyzed with reverse phase liquid chromatography while volatile compounds were analyzed using gas chromatography. Freeze-dried pulp from irradiated fruits had a higher (P ≤ 0.05) flavonoid content (naringin and narirutin) as compared to the freeze-dried pulp from the control fruits. Freeze-drying treatment reduced (P ≤ 0.05) the lycopene content, but the reduction (P ≤ 0.05) in β-carotene content occurred only in the control fruit. Reduction in d-limonene and myrcene was observed in the irradiated fruits at 6 days after harvest and in the freeze-dried samples. These results warrant testing of the effect of postharvest treatments and processing on bioactive compounds in functional systems as they have varied effects on different bioactive compounds of grapefruit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3980-3985
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of agricultural and food chemistry
Volume53
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 18 2005

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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