Biobehavioral Markers of Attention Bias Modification in Temperamental Risk for Anxiety: A Randomized Control Trial

Pan Liu, Bradley C. Taber-Thomas, Xiaoxue Fu, Koraly E. Pérez-Edgar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Children with behavioral inhibition, a temperament characterized by biologically based hypervigilance to novelty and social withdrawal, are at high risk for developing anxiety. This study examined the effect of a novel attention training protocol, attention bias modification (ABM), on symptomatic, behavioral, and neural risk markers in children with behavioral inhibition. Method: Nine- to 12-year-old typically developing children identified as having behavioral inhibition (N = 84) were assigned to a 4-session active ABM training (n = 43) or placebo protocol (n = 41) using a double-blinded, randomized, controlled trial approach. Anxiety symptoms (Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children–Fourth Edition), attention bias (AB; measured by a dot-probe task; AB = incongruent reaction time − congruent reaction time), and AB-related neural activation (measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging activation for the incongruent > congruent contrast in the dot-probe task) were assessed before and after the training sessions. Results: Results showed that active ABM (n = 40) significantly alleviated participants’ symptoms of separation anxiety, but not social anxiety, compared with the placebo task (n = 40); ABM did not modify behavioral AB scores in the dot-probe task; and at the neural level, active ABM (n = 15) significantly decreased amygdala and insula activation and increased activation in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex compared with placebo (n = 19). Conclusion: These findings provide important evidence for ABM as a potentially effective protective tool for temperamentally at-risk children in a developmental window before the emergence of clinical disorder and open to prevention and intervention. Clinical trial registration information—Attention and Social Behavior in Children (BRAINS); http://clinicaltrials.gov/; NCT02401282.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-110
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume57
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2018

Fingerprint

Anxiety
Placebos
Reaction Time
Separation Anxiety
Temperament
Social Behavior
Amygdala
Prefrontal Cortex
Appointments and Schedules
Randomized Controlled Trials
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Clinical Trials
Interviews
Inhibition (Psychology)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{72f1c22f35d9497b94c6dc1067c1dee2,
title = "Biobehavioral Markers of Attention Bias Modification in Temperamental Risk for Anxiety: A Randomized Control Trial",
abstract = "Objective: Children with behavioral inhibition, a temperament characterized by biologically based hypervigilance to novelty and social withdrawal, are at high risk for developing anxiety. This study examined the effect of a novel attention training protocol, attention bias modification (ABM), on symptomatic, behavioral, and neural risk markers in children with behavioral inhibition. Method: Nine- to 12-year-old typically developing children identified as having behavioral inhibition (N = 84) were assigned to a 4-session active ABM training (n = 43) or placebo protocol (n = 41) using a double-blinded, randomized, controlled trial approach. Anxiety symptoms (Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children–Fourth Edition), attention bias (AB; measured by a dot-probe task; AB = incongruent reaction time − congruent reaction time), and AB-related neural activation (measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging activation for the incongruent > congruent contrast in the dot-probe task) were assessed before and after the training sessions. Results: Results showed that active ABM (n = 40) significantly alleviated participants’ symptoms of separation anxiety, but not social anxiety, compared with the placebo task (n = 40); ABM did not modify behavioral AB scores in the dot-probe task; and at the neural level, active ABM (n = 15) significantly decreased amygdala and insula activation and increased activation in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex compared with placebo (n = 19). Conclusion: These findings provide important evidence for ABM as a potentially effective protective tool for temperamentally at-risk children in a developmental window before the emergence of clinical disorder and open to prevention and intervention. Clinical trial registration information—Attention and Social Behavior in Children (BRAINS); http://clinicaltrials.gov/; NCT02401282.",
author = "Pan Liu and Taber-Thomas, {Bradley C.} and Xiaoxue Fu and P{\'e}rez-Edgar, {Koraly E.}",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.jaac.2017.11.016",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "57",
pages = "103--110",
journal = "Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry",
issn = "0890-8567",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "2",

}

Biobehavioral Markers of Attention Bias Modification in Temperamental Risk for Anxiety : A Randomized Control Trial. / Liu, Pan; Taber-Thomas, Bradley C.; Fu, Xiaoxue; Pérez-Edgar, Koraly E.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol. 57, No. 2, 02.2018, p. 103-110.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Biobehavioral Markers of Attention Bias Modification in Temperamental Risk for Anxiety

T2 - A Randomized Control Trial

AU - Liu, Pan

AU - Taber-Thomas, Bradley C.

AU - Fu, Xiaoxue

AU - Pérez-Edgar, Koraly E.

PY - 2018/2

Y1 - 2018/2

N2 - Objective: Children with behavioral inhibition, a temperament characterized by biologically based hypervigilance to novelty and social withdrawal, are at high risk for developing anxiety. This study examined the effect of a novel attention training protocol, attention bias modification (ABM), on symptomatic, behavioral, and neural risk markers in children with behavioral inhibition. Method: Nine- to 12-year-old typically developing children identified as having behavioral inhibition (N = 84) were assigned to a 4-session active ABM training (n = 43) or placebo protocol (n = 41) using a double-blinded, randomized, controlled trial approach. Anxiety symptoms (Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children–Fourth Edition), attention bias (AB; measured by a dot-probe task; AB = incongruent reaction time − congruent reaction time), and AB-related neural activation (measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging activation for the incongruent > congruent contrast in the dot-probe task) were assessed before and after the training sessions. Results: Results showed that active ABM (n = 40) significantly alleviated participants’ symptoms of separation anxiety, but not social anxiety, compared with the placebo task (n = 40); ABM did not modify behavioral AB scores in the dot-probe task; and at the neural level, active ABM (n = 15) significantly decreased amygdala and insula activation and increased activation in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex compared with placebo (n = 19). Conclusion: These findings provide important evidence for ABM as a potentially effective protective tool for temperamentally at-risk children in a developmental window before the emergence of clinical disorder and open to prevention and intervention. Clinical trial registration information—Attention and Social Behavior in Children (BRAINS); http://clinicaltrials.gov/; NCT02401282.

AB - Objective: Children with behavioral inhibition, a temperament characterized by biologically based hypervigilance to novelty and social withdrawal, are at high risk for developing anxiety. This study examined the effect of a novel attention training protocol, attention bias modification (ABM), on symptomatic, behavioral, and neural risk markers in children with behavioral inhibition. Method: Nine- to 12-year-old typically developing children identified as having behavioral inhibition (N = 84) were assigned to a 4-session active ABM training (n = 43) or placebo protocol (n = 41) using a double-blinded, randomized, controlled trial approach. Anxiety symptoms (Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children–Fourth Edition), attention bias (AB; measured by a dot-probe task; AB = incongruent reaction time − congruent reaction time), and AB-related neural activation (measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging activation for the incongruent > congruent contrast in the dot-probe task) were assessed before and after the training sessions. Results: Results showed that active ABM (n = 40) significantly alleviated participants’ symptoms of separation anxiety, but not social anxiety, compared with the placebo task (n = 40); ABM did not modify behavioral AB scores in the dot-probe task; and at the neural level, active ABM (n = 15) significantly decreased amygdala and insula activation and increased activation in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex compared with placebo (n = 19). Conclusion: These findings provide important evidence for ABM as a potentially effective protective tool for temperamentally at-risk children in a developmental window before the emergence of clinical disorder and open to prevention and intervention. Clinical trial registration information—Attention and Social Behavior in Children (BRAINS); http://clinicaltrials.gov/; NCT02401282.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85041201875&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85041201875&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jaac.2017.11.016

DO - 10.1016/j.jaac.2017.11.016

M3 - Article

C2 - 29413142

AN - SCOPUS:85041201875

VL - 57

SP - 103

EP - 110

JO - Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

JF - Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

SN - 0890-8567

IS - 2

ER -