Biochemical analysis of human milk treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate, an alkyl sulfate microbicide that inactivates human immunodeficiency virus type 1

Sandra Urdaneta Hartmann, Brian Wigdahl, Elizabeth B. Neely, Cheston M. Berlin, Cara Lynne Schengrund, Hung Mo Lin, Mary K. Howett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Reduction of transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) through human milk is needed. Alkyl sulfates such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) are microbicidal against HIV-1 at low concentrations, have little to no toxicity, and are inexpensive. The authors have reported that treatment of HIV-1-infected human milk with ≤ 1% (10 mg/mL) SDS for 10 minutes inactivates cell-free and cell-associated virus. The SDS can be removed with a commercially available resin after treatment without recovery of viral infectivity. In this article, the authors report results of selective biochemical analyses (ie, protein, immunoglobulins, lipids, cells, and electrolytes) of human milk subjected to SDS treatment and removal. The SDS treatment or removal had no significant effects on the milk components studied. Therefore, the use of alkyl sulfate microbicides to treat milk from HIV-1-positive women may be a simple, practical, and nutritionally sound way to prevent or reduce transmission of HIV-1 while still feeding with mother's own milk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)61-74
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Human Lactation
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2006

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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