Bioelectronic artificial nose using four-channel moth antenna biopotential recordings

Andrew James Myrick, Thomas Charles Baker, K. C. Park, J. R. Hetling

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of insect antennae as an odor sensor array was evaluated as a means to advance the current capabilities of "artificial nose" technology. A given species is highly sensitive to odors of survival interest (e.g. species-specific pheromones), but also to a broad range of other natural and anthropogenic compounds. The sensitivity of the antennae to some odors extends to the parts per billion range [1]. In contrast, the best current artificial nose technology is able to detect compounds in the parts per million range. Here, a system designed to utilize four antenna biopotential signals suitable for field use and a computational analysis strategy which allows discrimination between specific odors, and between odor and background or unknown compounds, with high fidelity and in real time, is described. The automated analysis measures three parameters per odor response. Following a training period, a K nearest-neighbor (KNN) approach is used to classify an unknown odor, assuming equal prior probabilities. The algorithm can also declare an odor as "unknown". System responses to single filaments in an odor plume can be analyzed and classified in less than one second.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2nd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, 2005 - Conference Proceedings
Pages313-316
Number of pages4
Volume2005
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005
Event2nd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, 2005 - Arlington, VA, United States
Duration: Mar 16 2005Mar 19 2005

Other

Other2nd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, 2005
CountryUnited States
CityArlington, VA
Period3/16/053/19/05

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Odors
Antennas
Sensor arrays

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Myrick, A. J., Baker, T. C., Park, K. C., & Hetling, J. R. (2005). Bioelectronic artificial nose using four-channel moth antenna biopotential recordings. In 2nd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, 2005 - Conference Proceedings (Vol. 2005, pp. 313-316). [1419620] https://doi.org/10.1109/CNE.2005.1419620
Myrick, Andrew James ; Baker, Thomas Charles ; Park, K. C. ; Hetling, J. R. / Bioelectronic artificial nose using four-channel moth antenna biopotential recordings. 2nd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, 2005 - Conference Proceedings. Vol. 2005 2005. pp. 313-316
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Myrick, AJ, Baker, TC, Park, KC & Hetling, JR 2005, Bioelectronic artificial nose using four-channel moth antenna biopotential recordings. in 2nd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, 2005 - Conference Proceedings. vol. 2005, 1419620, pp. 313-316, 2nd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, 2005, Arlington, VA, United States, 3/16/05. https://doi.org/10.1109/CNE.2005.1419620

Bioelectronic artificial nose using four-channel moth antenna biopotential recordings. / Myrick, Andrew James; Baker, Thomas Charles; Park, K. C.; Hetling, J. R.

2nd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, 2005 - Conference Proceedings. Vol. 2005 2005. p. 313-316 1419620.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Myrick AJ, Baker TC, Park KC, Hetling JR. Bioelectronic artificial nose using four-channel moth antenna biopotential recordings. In 2nd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, 2005 - Conference Proceedings. Vol. 2005. 2005. p. 313-316. 1419620 https://doi.org/10.1109/CNE.2005.1419620