Biological fluid separation in microfluidic channels using flow rate control

Sung Yang, Akif Undar, Jeffery D. Zahn

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

A microfluidic device for continuous, real time blood plasma separation is introduced. This device is composed of a blood inlet, a purified plasma outlet, and a concentrated blood cell outlet. It is designed to separate blood plasma from an initial blood sample of up to 45 % hematocrit (Hct). The microfluidic device is designed and analyzed using an analogous electrical circuit, analytical and numerical studies. The numerical study results show that 27 % and 25 % of plasma volume can be separated from a total inlet blood volume of 45 % and 39 % hematocrit, respectively. The functionality of this device was demonstrated using defibrinated sheep blood (Hct=36 %). During 2 hrs. of continuous blood infusion through the device, all the blood cells traveled through the device toward the concentrated blood outlet while only the plasma flowed towards the plasma outlet without any clogging or lysis of cells. The experimentally measured plasma skimming volume was about 33 % for a 36 % inlet hematocrit. Due to the device's simple structure and control mechanism, this microdevice is expected to be used for highly efficient continuous, real time cell-free blood plasma separation device.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers, Fluids Engineering Division (Publication) FED
Pages283-289
Number of pages7
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Event2005 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2005 - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: Nov 5 2005Nov 11 2005

Publication series

NameAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers, Fluids Engineering Division (Publication) FED
Volume261 FED
ISSN (Print)0888-8116

Other

Other2005 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2005
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period11/5/0511/11/05

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

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  • Cite this

    Yang, S., Undar, A., & Zahn, J. D. (2005). Biological fluid separation in microfluidic channels using flow rate control. In American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Fluids Engineering Division (Publication) FED (pp. 283-289). (American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Fluids Engineering Division (Publication) FED; Vol. 261 FED). https://doi.org/10.1115/IMECE2005-80501