Biological underpinnings of breastfeeding challenges: The role of genetics, diet, and environment on lactation physiology

Sooyeon Lee, Shannon L. Kelleher

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lactation is a dynamic process that has evolved to produce a complex biological fluid that provides nutritive and nonnutritive factors to the nursing offspring. It has long been assumed that once lactation is successfully initiated, the primary factor regulating milk production is infant demand. Thus, most interventions have focused on improving breastfeeding education and early lactation support. However, in addition to infant demand, increasing evidence from studies conducted in experimental animal models, production animals, and breastfeeding women suggests that a diverse array of maternal factors may also affect milk production and composition. In this review, we provide an overview of our current understanding of the role of maternal genetics and modifiable factors, such as diet and environmental exposures, on reproductive endocrinology, lactation physiology, and the ability to successfully produce milk. To identify factors that may affect lactation in women, we highlight some information gleaned from studies in experimental animal models and production animals. Finally, we highlight the gaps in current knowledge and provide commentary on future research opportunities aimed at improving lactation outcomes in breastfeeding women to improve the health of mothers and their infants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E405-E422
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume311
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

Fingerprint

Breast Feeding
Lactation
Diet
Milk
Mothers
Animal Models
Aptitude
Endocrinology
Environmental Exposure
Nursing
Education
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

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Biological underpinnings of breastfeeding challenges : The role of genetics, diet, and environment on lactation physiology. / Lee, Sooyeon; Kelleher, Shannon L.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 311, No. 2, 01.08.2016, p. E405-E422.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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