Biopsychological and cognitive differences in children with premature vs on-time adrenarche

Lorah D. Dorn, Static F. Hitt, Deborah Rotenstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Puberty consists of 2 components: gonadarche and adrenarche. Both components have distinct endocrine changes. Adrenarche has virtually been ignored with respect to examining hormone-behavior relations. Objectives: To provide descriptive biological and behavioral information on children with premature adrenarche (PA) and to examine differences in biological, psychological, and cognitive variables of children with PA and a healthy comparison group of children with on-time adrenarche. Design: Descriptive pilot study. Setting: A consecutive sample of patients was recruited from pediatric endocrine clinics; comparison children were recruited from the community. Participants: Children aged 6 to 9 years. Mean (±SD) age of children with PA (n = 9) was 7.8 (±1.3) years; of children with on-time adrenarche (n = 20), 8.0 (±1.2) years. Methods and Measures: Serum and saliva samples were collected for measurement of hormone concentrations. Questionnaires, tests, and interviews were completed by children and parents. Results: Compared with the on-time group, the PA group had significantly higher concentrations of adrenal androgens, estradiol, thyrotropin, and cortisol. By parent report on the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, 4 children (44%) met diagnostic criteria for psychological disorders (primarily anxiety disorders). The PA group also had more self-reported depression and parent-reported behavior problems and lower scores on various intelligence tests. Conclusions: Although PA is considered a normal variation of pubertal development that warrants no medical intervention, PA presents with significant psychosocial problems. Children with PA may need psychological evaluation and follow-up. Future studies should confirm these findings with a larger sample and examine the long-term ramifications of this early presenting abnormality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)137-146
Number of pages10
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume153
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1999

Fingerprint

Adrenarche
Psychology
Hormones
Interviews
Intelligence Tests
Thyrotropin
Puberty
Anxiety Disorders
Saliva

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

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title = "Biopsychological and cognitive differences in children with premature vs on-time adrenarche",
abstract = "Background: Puberty consists of 2 components: gonadarche and adrenarche. Both components have distinct endocrine changes. Adrenarche has virtually been ignored with respect to examining hormone-behavior relations. Objectives: To provide descriptive biological and behavioral information on children with premature adrenarche (PA) and to examine differences in biological, psychological, and cognitive variables of children with PA and a healthy comparison group of children with on-time adrenarche. Design: Descriptive pilot study. Setting: A consecutive sample of patients was recruited from pediatric endocrine clinics; comparison children were recruited from the community. Participants: Children aged 6 to 9 years. Mean (±SD) age of children with PA (n = 9) was 7.8 (±1.3) years; of children with on-time adrenarche (n = 20), 8.0 (±1.2) years. Methods and Measures: Serum and saliva samples were collected for measurement of hormone concentrations. Questionnaires, tests, and interviews were completed by children and parents. Results: Compared with the on-time group, the PA group had significantly higher concentrations of adrenal androgens, estradiol, thyrotropin, and cortisol. By parent report on the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, 4 children (44{\%}) met diagnostic criteria for psychological disorders (primarily anxiety disorders). The PA group also had more self-reported depression and parent-reported behavior problems and lower scores on various intelligence tests. Conclusions: Although PA is considered a normal variation of pubertal development that warrants no medical intervention, PA presents with significant psychosocial problems. Children with PA may need psychological evaluation and follow-up. Future studies should confirm these findings with a larger sample and examine the long-term ramifications of this early presenting abnormality.",
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Biopsychological and cognitive differences in children with premature vs on-time adrenarche. / Dorn, Lorah D.; Hitt, Static F.; Rotenstein, Deborah.

In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vol. 153, No. 2, 02.1999, p. 137-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Background: Puberty consists of 2 components: gonadarche and adrenarche. Both components have distinct endocrine changes. Adrenarche has virtually been ignored with respect to examining hormone-behavior relations. Objectives: To provide descriptive biological and behavioral information on children with premature adrenarche (PA) and to examine differences in biological, psychological, and cognitive variables of children with PA and a healthy comparison group of children with on-time adrenarche. Design: Descriptive pilot study. Setting: A consecutive sample of patients was recruited from pediatric endocrine clinics; comparison children were recruited from the community. Participants: Children aged 6 to 9 years. Mean (±SD) age of children with PA (n = 9) was 7.8 (±1.3) years; of children with on-time adrenarche (n = 20), 8.0 (±1.2) years. Methods and Measures: Serum and saliva samples were collected for measurement of hormone concentrations. Questionnaires, tests, and interviews were completed by children and parents. Results: Compared with the on-time group, the PA group had significantly higher concentrations of adrenal androgens, estradiol, thyrotropin, and cortisol. By parent report on the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, 4 children (44%) met diagnostic criteria for psychological disorders (primarily anxiety disorders). The PA group also had more self-reported depression and parent-reported behavior problems and lower scores on various intelligence tests. Conclusions: Although PA is considered a normal variation of pubertal development that warrants no medical intervention, PA presents with significant psychosocial problems. Children with PA may need psychological evaluation and follow-up. Future studies should confirm these findings with a larger sample and examine the long-term ramifications of this early presenting abnormality.

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